Music of the Month; Captain Blood


So, let’s take it from the top

I do think these Monthly Musics have become too formulaic, yes. Rather than laying out what’s planned for the month, which still amounts I don’t know yet, I’ll just try to return to the form and write about whatever rather than trying to make an honest to God quality post. But you never do.

The selection of this month’s music isn’t really for anything. While I did say the chosen music would reflect something that’s going to pass on during the months, that’s become less a thing and more a memory. Much like aiming for a theme for the months, because such things never go well in the long run. An occasional special even is alright, but not a constant renovation where there is no need for it.

The original music for the post Top Man’s stage theme from a remixed album, but in the end I decided to switch that up. I’m not sure if I ever mentioned how the Monthly Music started as a sort of carbon copy of Game Soundtrack You Might Don’t Know, but stood apart from that source the very next month. However, in spirit of the original intent of posting video game music you may not know about, I’ve picked a track that’s partially nostalgic for yours truly, partially just kinda out there. Perhaps not really unknown track, seeing Captain Blood‘s opening tends to pop here and there. Then again, it is a version of Ethnicolor by Jean Michel Derre. Honestly, not a bad song. I remember playing this game once or twice at a friend’s place, and it’s very, very strange titles to say the least. Well, at least at the time, nobody had any head how to actually play the damn thing. If you’re interested in a game that uses iconographic communication between different alien species with some flying elements thrown in there, give it a look. It’s an interesting title to say the least, and represents some of the more fascinating titles the European PC gaming had to offer at the time.

Somebody really should write a book about the differences in PC gaming in the 1980’s between Europe, Japan and America.

Remembering all this really makes me laugh at myself. I started playing games on an Atari ST, and now that I look back at things a bit more accurately, we had loads of games with load times and load-in screens going on. All the multi-disc games had those, with Indiana Jones and the last Crusade being a terrible game, yet one that I always wanted to play. Because it’s Indiana Jones dammit. At some point with the NES I got far too used to titles that had no loading times whatsoever. Now, it feels like all games require a patch to install, installing to the HDD, trophy data installation and then something else for whatever reason. Then you get to few minutes of logos before you even get into the main menu. Shows you much consoles have moved away from their roots and have become more and more like computers.

Nostalgia carries only so far, and I do feel that despite all the good memories and things have from our own childhoods, it would serve the future generations better if we wouldn’t force our interest on them.

With all the political bullshit going on left and right, some things will become vessels to messages and intentions. Nothing’s sacred in this, everything’s a fair game. I just wish cartoons for kids would at least be left alone, but seeing how some cartoons are almost made as a political statement from the get-go, it’s no wonder if someone else puts a blatant, direct jab as a joke about something they oppose. It’s disappointing to see some cartoon to have a direct message shoved into it rather build it naturally within the fiction. It’s incredibly easy and direct, but such name dropping takes one out of the story. It’s like pausing a show for a drug PSA.

One of the marks of a great children’s cartoon is when a moral play is embed into the story. Kids aren’t as stupid as people want to make them to be. While He-Man and the Masters of the Universe might get laughs from a modern audience for its end-show lessons, but these were handled extremely well for their time. Furthermore, the moral lesson itself was already embed into the episode itself, making the lesson really more or less a moot point. This, however, did not detract from the quality of the show, even when it had to fight against the remnant anti-violence stance and rules from the 1970’s.

But whatchya gonna do? I just want well written cartoons that I can enjoy with my nephews that don’t shove it to our faces. Let’s wait for few more years before I start watching Gundam with them. That’s the most political this blog mostly gets.

 

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