Music of the Month; Rydeen


Rydeen was also used as the battle them in  Ginga no Sannin on the Famicom

This month will be completely freefalled. Due to my physical health having a momentary glitch in the system and nothing all that neat being coming across, there are no plans for a review. Well, not entirely true, but I’m not sure how would one go with reviewing whisky glasses. We’ll cross that bridge if/when we get there.

I missed my last month’s goal to make a Guilty Gear design comparison post. Mostly because I had forgotten all about it and partially because lack of time. I resorted to combine some of the previous series of posts twice over already. If its any consolation, the GG gets priority, even if it means missing a post or two here and there. I’ll try to coerce A9 to do few more guest posts about Digimon, even when he enjoys being a consumer over being a provider.

There’s a new Cutie Honey show hitting the airwaves this month with a subtitle of Universe. There was some interesting in seeing a contrast and comparison of her outfit throughout the years. Considering the franchise debuted in 1973, there is quite the load of small variations here and there. I would have to limit myself to the largest entries, consisting the original comic versions, the few OVAs we’ve got and the live-action entries we’ve gotten during this new millennia.

I may have a bias with Cutie Honey though, considering I like the concepts and author more than most of the stories we’ve seen come from it. An android girls with the power to fabricate a new identity on command on a road to avenge his father’s death is a strong point to start with, but often the end results have been less than impressive. The original cartoon’s solid though, and so is some of the subsequent comics and series.

That’s the kind of duality you come across with this blog, I guess. It’s something that stems from the usual author/individual mindset, at least most of the time. On one hand, the author doesn’t matter on any level. The work must stand on its own merits. However, author’s intent should be something to be taken into consideration, what’s being said, how and why.  It would be so easy simply to analyse everything as one would wish and have a merry day with it, which makes it moot when we can make anything out of any other thing. No matter literary training and education will be enough to carry you, when the author’s word goes against your interpretation.

This sounds like that the authors matters, despite the original claim. It would be more accurate to say that the intention and word of the author matters over his physical presence, and anything that might come with it. However, the nature of man doesn’t allow this sort of clean separation. We’re social creatures, after all. We tend to feel like we know the people through their works. For example, if we watch someone on Youtube talking about a subject for an extended period of time, and may get an interaction or two. We begin to feel like we’re talked to directly, or that something has been prepared directly for us through the author’s work, and we grow this faux-sort of familiarity with them. The more time passes as we spend time with the work, the more the author in our heads begin to matter.

The Internet has changed things significantly, as we can get into touch with pretty much anyone with even the slightest presence if we want to. It just might take some work, but it’s always an option. If we have a positive disposition towards the author through his works, reality might slap us in the face, or we might be end up used a promotional vessel. It’d be a probably net positive for everyone of us, if we’d just keep a natural distance to authors outside the usual events and such.

I’m not sure where I’m going with this, but hey, Monthly Musics are not exactly highly demanded, nobody really reads these. Well, that maybe that extends elsewhere as well, but let’s not begin to depress this hobby any further.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.