Valve’s wake-up call for visual novel enthusiast and others

With Valve taking steps to remove numerous titles from Steam due to T&A, Mangagamer has decided to bring their titles to GOG. The last sentence in their post also mentions how Sekai Project, the infamous VN publisher, is joining them in this move.

Mangagamer questions Steam a retail platform for visual novels, and that has been an extremely good question from the start. Steam as a digital console has the exact same limitations as vast majority of other game consoles have had throughout the years when it has come to sexually mature content. The last console that allowed some sort of clothes-off action was the Sega Saturn with its R-18 rated gambling titles, though even then the titles were cleaned up from their arcade and PC counterparts. Whether or not it really is better to have violence than sex in media has always been brought to question, but that’s slightly outside the scope here.

The PR director for Mangagamer, John Picket, knows how to word this opening salvo towards GOG. There has been some friction why these titles have not appeared on GOG, mostly due to GOG having different set of guidelines than Valve, but calling this an opportunity rather than an option forced on them is standard marketing speech. Considering Steam has always been an unreliable publishing platform due to how Valve exercises their control over titles, developers, publishers and users, this movement should not have come out as a surprise to anyone. Valve’s customer support is legendarily terrible, and their ~30% cut of all sales, which yields less and less revenue to publishers down the line, especially when most users simply purchase everything from sales. In previous post about VN bans on Steam I mentioned how their policies went against EU legislation when it came to purchasing, resale and refunding titles, but what I didn’t mention was that Valve put in bit in their EULA before purchase where the consumer would waver their freedom for 14-day return period. Similarly, when Valve was in court in Australia over similar matter between 2014 and 2016, they stopped providing their financial information, which ended the judge giving them a middle finger in legalise form. All legal cases that they knew they couldn’t sensibly win has been elongated for PR reasons and to create proper backup whenever the inevitable end result comes to.

While EA is considered to be the Satan of game corporations, credit must be given where credit is due, and their did have refunding program as according to EU legislation two years prior to Valve, and even then Valve’s refunding program was in Steam credits, meaning they still keep your money. Valve’s policies get changed from time to time to reflect the pressure they’re under from outside forces, all to cover their own assets and revenues. That is ultimately the end goal of all corporations, after all.

Valve has the control over the PC side of game market like no other to the point of publishers and developers considering any other route a detriment to their product. After a company has partnered with Valve to get their titles to Steam, everything else gets so muddled down. Why would you want to publish games on other platforms when Steam has essentially become the Windows in terms of digital games publishing? We’re at a point where an anti-trust case about their monopoly could be made, but that won’t happen. Too many consumers and companies are tied to Steam both in terms of money and emotions. Only something that would break the glass would make them consider twice on Steam. Something like taking down titles for them having bare chests.

But Aalt, aren’t you the one always championing game exclusivity? Yes, with consoles. The PC is a different market than consoles and is based on user-end freedom, something that has been constantly eroding through the use programs like Steam, taking Operating System control away from the user and evermore increasing activity tracking to the point of end-user having no privacy. If consoles are tightly controlled platforms for single purpose only, the PC was its free counterpart, where everything from your hardware choice to how you modified your software was completely up to you. Now, if you modify software linked with Steam to any extent unsavory for them, you’re going to be banned.

Valve has no competition. GOG is a good second, but far behind Steam in terms of dedicated users, despite GOG always being the objectively better option for software. Japan has DLSite and DMM for both pornographic materials and normal titles, something that Nutaku reflects in the West. There are numerous smaller publishing platforms that do not tie the user to themselves, but due to lack of publishers on these platforms they’ve never reached the surface awareness.

There is a distinct lack of diverse competition on the PC currently and it is not because of exclusives. This has been case for a good decade now, with even vast majority of the small amount of physical titles needing to be connected to a service as a form of DRM. This had lead Valve to had an effective control over PC software when it comes to gaming and their like titles, like visual novels. It should come to no surprise to anyone when Valve decides to exert their control on anything that might be seen as unsavory for their own benefits.

4 thoughts on “Valve’s wake-up call for visual novel enthusiast and others

  1. 30% cut is an industry standard (both GOG, Humble, Origin, Uplay and console stores take this), yet it’s always used as a diss wrt to Valve for some reason.
    And the notion that Valve has a monopoly on PC gaming is laughable, considering most of top PC games aren’t available on Steam (LoL, Fortnite, Overwatch, WoW, Heartstone, Minecraft, World of Tanks)

  2. 30% is the standard, yet it hurts far more due to the constant sales, which was the point. For each example you cited that’s not on Steam you have there are numerous titles that are not outside of Valve’s services, especially when ports are considered.

  3. There are constant sales on all of the other platforms I mentioned, so I really don’t see how Valve can be made the bad guy here.
    Also I’m not sure how you can persist with the monopoly statement, when bloody LoL alone has more players than whole Steam. How is that a Valve monopoly.
    Not to say their response to the whole VN kerflufle was right. Just that some of your arguments are factually incorrect.

    1. The question is not of anyone being bad guy. No other platform enjoys the same amount of hype or userbase as Valve’s, which has also set the trend of constant and periodical special sales. Certainly other digital service providers will follow a successful example, despite it ultimately being detriment for the end value of the product.
      The userbase of LoL and Steam lap each other, just like most high-end console users own more than one platform. Valve’s monopoly stems from them essentially being the de-facto platform for most publishers. Considering, for example, all of Capcom’s current PC games are tied to Steam, which wasn’t a thing before second iteration of Street Fighter IV. Same applies to Bandai-Namco’s titles. The monopoly does not only come from Steam having the largest userbase of its kind, but also that it has near exclusivity with numerous publishers when it comes to PC releases. GOG is very often the second best option at best, in similar position to Apple to Windows when it comes to their competition with Steam.

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