Review: Myst 25th Anniversary Kickstarter packaging is shit

The very first thing your customer notices about a product, be it on the store shelves, online pictures or when receiving the item in mail, is the packaging. Ignore the quality of the packaging and you lose the customer. It’s extremely easy to make a terrible packaging by making few low-effort choices, like choosing weak cardboard because its cheaper, unfitting box size because that allows items to rattle and be damaged during transit (be it from the store or via mail) or have no support for the item within the box.

Package illustration and text are a whole another dimension that add to the mix. Cheap printing will automatically spell how much the producer cares about the producer cares about the product overall. Some fanzines have better printing that some mainline comics nowadays. The logos, the catchphrases, the descriptions, everything that reads of the package has to be both up to legal standards and to attract and convince the customer that this is the product worthy of their money.

A worthy packaging takes money, time and skill. A package designer is well worth the money he gets paid and is a field of design that nobody really thinks about. It’s a thankless job that you only remember exists when you face a terrible packaging.

Of course you could ignore most of that and just throw some discs in a sleeve and call it a day.

Oh for fuck’s sake Cyan

The reason why Cyan Inc (and Incorporated they are) did this is because the higher tier backers on Kickstarter get a custom build book that houses the games. This is all fine and dandy, until you realise that these poor bastards will get their games in the same cheap bargain bin sleeves. Let’s get to the root why this packaging is shit to the core and nobody should do this, unless they’re releasing cheap shit to the market at the lowest possible price.

First of all, there is no protective support. Sure, the sleeves themselves support from some of the damage that dust or such could do, but that goes out of the window the moment you realise that everything will get in from the open side. There’s no mechanism to keep any of that out.

While these sleeves are an age-old way to house a disc, it’s also one of the worst ways. Compact discs like these have a tendency to moving and spinning inside their sleeves, unlike LPs and LDs that have some weight in them to keep them in place during transit. This causes chafing that will cause smudges, and sometimes with low quality rough cardboard, leave a permanent mark on the disc’s surfaces.

Then you have the fact that the sleeves can’t take any physical damage. These were delivered as you see now, in a stack with no protective box around them in a vacuum sealed bag. You can see the first sleeve has already given in and creased itself against the disc inside. The sleeve is already damaged by sheer act of being shipped. If it’s put on the shelf, the pressure from whatever is around it will continue to press the sleeve against the disc, further creasing it. It’s unusable as a long-term storing device, necessitating the customer to come up something on their own, like buying jewel cases for the discs. You don’t see it on the photo, but all the sleeves are also scuffed up already from chafing against each other, especially on the back.

This photo is intentionally bad with that lamp light on the left, because it shows how scuffed and creased the the backs are already just from shipping and sitting on my desk untouched for a day. Every back is the same, with the nice . There are scratches that are directly from the production, handling and packaging.

Actually, some of the sleeves are already damaged from the production. Whatever company made these didn’t make sure that when the prints are separated, the cut would be clean. Instead you have those rip nubs, also slightly visible on the left of on the sleeve.

Let’s check the disc design and leave the sleeves for the time being.

The disc design in itself is nice, but far from what looks like what Myst should have. It’s effectively giant C and some low-effort text thrown in there. Apparently advertising Cyan Inc. was more important than creating a fitting look for each of the disc, or re-using the existing designs. Ubisoft’s Myst Collection beats 25th Anniversary collection in design and sleeves 1 to zero. Plastic sleeves at least protect the discs properly. Notice also that the print is ever so hazy on the disc, meaning this is once more one of those points where money was pinched out. The Big C is sharp, the text not so much. It’s far from the worst, but with minimalist design like this you don’t have any room to screw up a single element. Also how the platform text, Windows in my case, has a terrible positioning. It would have looked far better midway down the black Myst text and the legal text down there. That C is just too governing and taking too much room.

To be fair, the sleeves have a nice artwork on them, which each one of them having its own frame texture with a window. It’s not much, but at least it goes with the theme

Cyan Inc. never stated how or in what sort of packaging their physical goods would be delivered in. This is something that any backer should make a note of in the future Kickstarters they may back and demand that the packaging must be up to standards. This isn’t. This is far from being what is expected from almost three million dollar Kickstarter. I might’ve given the Muv-Luv Kickstarter packaging some shit, but that’s a winner with platinum medal level of quality compared to to what Cyan has delivered with these.

This is the lowest and cheapest way to produce and pack their game collection, and if anyone wants any longevity from these, they are required to go out and purchase some kind of jewel case or one of those multi-disc packages, and then print their own sleeve to go with it.

Frankly, it’s shit.

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