The Virtual Console still lingers in Nintendo’s memory

Let’s not beat around the bush, the Virtual Console was one of the best decisions Nintendo made with the Wii and its subsequent iterations. The amount of sales they made across all the three platforms the VC was on was pretty impressive, and the Wii itself even sold with the VC itself. I’ve said it before and I will say it in the future; if I were a game developer and/or publisher that had to put their game on a console where Super Mario Bros 3. was available, I’d be scared of the quality of the competition. We can’t deny its quality and impact. It would appear that VC made Nintendo, especially Shigeru Miyamoto, realise that people were still interested in thirty years old games. This isn’t exactly rare with game industry, but a well made game does not age. Well technically it does, but it ages like a fine whisky. Wine be damned.

In a recent Investors’ Q&A, Shigsy mentions how their old software are active even after thirty years, and that they have no choice but to port these titles to new platforms. Funnily enough, there are tons of games that never got ported to modern platforms nor did Nintendo see fit to port these games to some other platforms. Nevertheless, he began to think if Nintendo could combine their evergreen library with video and use that in a similar, years-on fashion. Hence why the new Super Mario Bros. movie is being produced. What’s interesting, and perhaps even comedic about this, is Shigsy claiming that he didn’t exactly want to make a Mario movie, but that it would be a great vehicle to have more people exposed to the brand.

Effectively, what Shigsy is talking about is repeating already tested method of Nintendo IPs spreading across the media.

This has been an age old topic for the blog. During the Third and Fourth Generation of consoles, Nintendo’s intellectual property and branding was everywhere. Television, breakfast cereals, waffles, comics, clothing, music, they were everywhere. Especially in the US, European markets weren’t assaulted as much due to completely different market dynamics. Japan experienced its own multimedia of Nintendo products, and it never really stopped. However, maybe they didn’t have the cartoons, those were very much an American product to the American audience. The Super Mario Super Show was spread rather wide elsewhere, but quick lookup gives up little sources in Japanese, videos or otherwise.

Italians always outdid others with their songs, for better or worse

It has been the standard for Nintendo spread their IPs across the media table as an advertisement for their game and console line-up. While it is possible that Nintendo of Japan has forgotten about all the media that got branded with Nintendo’s labels, I doubt that is the case. Even if it were, the success of Virtual Console’s success clearly left a serious impact on Shigsy. It must be hard to realise the big budget games you love to make were beaten by thirty years old titles. Is he thinking that they don’t have a large customer base to go by, that their titles are not selling to new, younger audiences because the lack of multimedia exposure? This should be business as usual for everyone involved, but for whatever reason Shigsy treats it as some kind judgment on him, that he just realised how a movie can market their main merchandise and that he has to see it done. That doesn’t sounds like the Shigsy we’ve seen throughout the years. We’re talking about the man who would rather have his game development seem like a fun school project and doesn’t want to work on 2D Mario games because directing and designing them takes so much effort. As disingenuous as it may sound, this sounds load of bullshit and a way to bed a path to save face if needed. Despite it being an investors’ Q&A, the corporate way of putting things is still the standard.

Nintendo, especially Shigsy and his team, has a habit of not doing what seems sensible to most, like developing a new F-Zero game for motion controls. That was saved for Mario Kart. Things are only done if they find a new way to doing things, innovating on some significant aspects or otherwise “surprise” the player somehow. That’s why you have 3D Marios trying to reinvent the wheel with FLUDD, planets and throwing hats around. Nintendo doesn’t exactly push forwards their IPs as much as they want to give it tricks and polish. If we’re being uncharitably here, it could be said that Shigsy wants to do a new Mario movie now, because there’s something he wants to do with it. Though it probably is more that Nintendo is coming around about spreading their IP again, through they’ve been relatively slow with the progress. There’s a clear and tight control when it comes to games on mobile platforms and series, though toys seem to be no issue for them. Japan still has running Mario comics and all that, but nothing that would appear on Western markets to the same extent.

Super Mario-kun is 25 years old by this point and only few countries have translated any of it.

The 1993 Super Mario Bros. movie probably soured Nintendo’s wishes to make movies based on their IPs, especially based on Mario (though they already had animated OVAs at that point.) It’s not that the upcoming movie is treading any new ground in any fashion, but that for whatever reason VC made Nintendo realise that almost all of their old games still hold value. Especially the big names ones. Hell, even with The Legend of Zelda we saw how much success Nintendo had by bringing Breath of the Wild closer to the original Zelda model and play. Did it really take the VC for Shigsy to realise how much the history of their media matters? It would appear so, but at the same time, what a way to screw of the VC with the subscription service. I guess that was part of renewing the way these games were brought to the customers, or maybe the whole issue of licenses was too much a bother. Whether or not keeping the VC as it were around would have been more beneficial than whatever the current form Nintendo has for its subscription service, but the memory of VC and all those thirty plus years of products still loom over them. Nintendo shares a lot with Sega in this, with both of them having to chase past glory all the while needing to push the envelope. Obsoleting evergreen classics is incredibly hard.

 

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