Tournament without sportsmanship

While coughing blood and phlegm, I missed EVO completely. Nothing unusual about that, the EVO tournament doesn’t interest yours truly. However, EVO is of interest in regards of this blog and how its seen, and this year had a peculiar event with Super Smash Bros. tournament that as a case study shows two things; video games are not a sport, and not even the participants truly see it as a sport.

The event of course is the already infamous grand finals for Super Smash Bros for Console X. At 15:00 minute mark, both players simply stop playing the game for nearly two minutes. Thus far you can argue that there was competitive play for the top spot, but at that point everything becomes a joke.

This is not sportsmanship behaviour, this is what you’d see in show wrestling. That’s what eSports is, and thus it is far from being worth entering to Olympics in any fashion.

Some have argued that the two players can dictate whatever method of playing they wish, that is their choice as top finalist. This is not true, as every sports has to have strict rules the participants have to adhere to and will be promptly punished if these rules are broken; the finalist do not get to choose who they play. No other seriously competitive field, from pool to golf, from karate to card games, from F-1 to Nascar, everyone participating are required to make their best effort to win according to laid rules and there is no room to wiggle about.

Despite the two players here were warned of stalling, they did not gain any sort of penalty outside booing. Instead, both of them should have been disqualified not just on base of stalling, but also for interrupting a match for an interview, breaking sportsmanship and unfair competition.

Why unfair competition? Many athletes are friends, but yet they don’t go easy on each other out of respect towards each other and towards the sport. These two yahoos are friends who didn’t go their extra mile for maximum effort in competition and instead chose for showmanship. Whether or not you want to call this collusion is up to you.

Of course, we also have take notice that making the competitors sit next to each other rather than apart allows this sort of interactions between the competitors. EVO should have embraced the arcade approach years back and have the players fight opposing each other, or at least with good few meters apart. Does this remove a psych element from the game? Yes, and it should, as then the players’ actual skill in the game can be concentrated more than on any theatrics. Having these two jokers separated from each other would’ve alleviated some of their antics, but somehow the two buffoons would’ve made a joke out of it anyway.

The competitors’ age does not matter, be it teenagers like with these two Smash Bros. players or forty something who has played Street Fighter their whole life. People of their age can and are competing in real sports with the right mindset and compete with others like them for the top spot.

This isn’t the first time EVO has seen these “moments” where players show off some reason. Some years back, two E. Honda players in Street Fighter IV allowed the first round of their match to time out in order to have a one-round match in order to see which one of them was better. The same should have applied in this case as with this year’s Smash Bros.; no competition means getting the boot. You can argue stalling or running away is a legit tactic that can be applied, but that has to be in proper context. Just standing and waiting for whatever reason in a battling competition should get you the boot. After all, fighting game tournaments mirror the real world martial arts competitions in spirit, and simply fucking around goes directly against that spirit.

Then again, as a profession (used here extremely loosely) being a top Street Fighter player or whatnot doesn’t bring in much in terms of finances. It’s not secret that the tournament winners often share their price money with other top players in order to keep them from living on the streets. It is an extremely stressful field and losing sponsorship is extremely easy.

Does this encompass all players and games played competitively? Of course not, yet EVO as a whole is a great example of how competitive video gaming is just a play akin to show wrestling, as mentioned. EVO needs to get back to its Battle by the Bay roots and have one rule above all; find out who is the best in a given game. This alone sets certain principle rules and required mindset. We can make jokes about Smash Bros. and their rule sets all day long, but this is universal; a fighting game tournament only exists to find out who is the best. Any actions to detriment this should be treated with extreme prejudice and cut down like a tumor.

Video games are not sports. They’re anything but sports. They certainly require large amount of skill and dedication to get good at, yet there are constantly examples how juvenile the medium is across the board. Video and computer games are a young industry, and this shows itself hard with competitive situations like EVO. There is an extreme lack maturity and class. Unlike Olympics and other real sports events, EVO has quite honestly zero respect outside its own bubble. Furthermore, this year the TV licenses were far less important and we saw no outfit censorship, because last year’s viewership was less than expected.

Video games might be the most popular form of entertainment, but sure hell ain’t the most respected. The only way you can get respect for you wannabe sports and hobby is to act like your age, stop screaming bloody hell every time you see boobies and take competitive shit seriously, no matter what sort of party game gets mixed with serious fighting titles.

Review; Switch Joycons

Two reviews, in the same month? That’s what I call Lack of proper topics but mainly because the Joycons themselves are rather interesting piece of hardware once you get around how they’re spun around.

 

Why grey? Because I intend to change the shells on the controllers and the grey one cost me twenty eurobucks less

The JoyCons are essentially Wiimote 2.0. When attached to the main unit/screen, it becomes the second most unwieldiest portable console after the Lynx. It’s general shapes follows Sony’s handhelds and the Wii U pad quote closely, but at this points its more a necessity of ergonomics than lack of ideas. After all, pretty much all controllers follow the same core design nowadays rather than having widely different takes.

Of course, the main gimmick the JoyCons have is the ability to detached them and use them in tandem or individually. This is very neat, but at the same time these controllers are small by necessity. While slightly wider than the Hori Commander Mini I reviewed on the Famicom, everything else is in smaller scale. When used as single controller, you have access to the stick, four face buttons, two “shoulder” buttons L and LZ, and “top” buttons SL and SR. You can see these on the railing. Depending on the controller, you have Home or Capture button, and Plus and Minus (essentially glorified Start buttons.) The button that exist as shoulder buttons when JoyCons are attached to the main unit or grip rest awkwardly near your palm. The ergonomics are also lacking, but that comes with the size.

The most important part with the shoulder button there is that there is no sharp corners or danger for you finger to be pressed between the shell and the button. This is done by giving the button very short travel. Also, notice how the release button is tucked away into a corner

The sticks aren’t exactly the best, and it could use some some of the clickiness NeoGeo Pocket has. They lack any sort of tactile feel, despite the cutouts on the rubber. You simply don’t feel it. It has very short travel distance, which means control with tension becomes a must with certain games that require extensive stick control.

As the controllers have to work both as single entities and in tandem, the placement for the action buttons are sacrificed. They’re very much in the middle of the controller, which works when in tandem, but in single mode they’re just too far from the left edge, though larger hands could probably find this comfortable distance. This is also the reason why there’s no D-Pad on the Switch; everything has to do dual task, and these facebuttons, that use N64 controller’s C-Stick directions, work as D-Pad when used in tandem. It’s awkward and lacks the same smooth use as with normal D-Pad, and sadly its serviceable by a hair. Their dimensions and placement has been worked to its optimum. The buttons themselves are of better Nintendo standard, where the travel is pretty spot on, perfectly raised above the level and have nice tactile feedback.

It must be said that accessing the SL and SR buttons are surprisingly accessible, as index fingers seem to naturally hit their place. On themselves, they’re a bit too flat to use properly, but that’s why Nintendo gave us the wrist attachment people seem to put the wrong way constantly.

Plus and Minus are tucked away in the corner nicely so you don’t hit them, but whatever mode of control you use, they’re awkward to use. Think of Xbox’s Duke’s black and white buttons and you get somewhat similar idea.

 The wrist attachment slide the opposite way you slide the controller into the main unit, corner symbol meeting corner symbol. This adds some heft to a JoyCon and makes it somewhat nicer to hold in your hands, but its main use really is to make the SR and SL buttons more accessible with the larger pass-through buttons.

While you can use JoyCons in tandem separately like with the WiiMote and its nunchuck, Nintendo shipped the console with the grip attachment. It’s not exactly the best however. It’s like they wanted everything to stay straight and have the JoyCons sit like they sit on the main unit. This means whenever you use this, accessing the left face buttons for D-Pad use and the right stick requires either over-extending your thumb downwards or move the whole whole on the handles. Supposedly, the prototype was in an angle to give it more ergonomic shape, but for whatever reason this was dropped. There are many custom attachments on eBay that fix this and make this the most viable option to use the JoyCons in tandem. It would seem that the JoyCons will see rather large amount of optional accessories and attachments down the line. Here’s hoping Hori will do some good ones in the future, like the upcoming D-Padded JoyCon.

So, bottom line? The JoyCons are not the best controllers out there. The whole thing of them working as a single unit or in tandem forces just enough compromises to make all of them feel somewhat awkward. As usual, once you get used to them, muscle memory handles moving your hand up and down as needed. If there had been some concessions for functionality over visual design, these would have been winners as first hybrid console controllers. As they are now, JoyCons do their job, but the alternatives are probably better.

I must admit that the JoyCons have one thing over all other controllers; Switch has the most satisfying feel of clicks and clacks whenever you are attaching them to anything.

Losing battle against ROMs

Rather than discussing how disappointed I’m in the Mega Man X Legacy Collections input lag, removed songs and censorship, the more interesting topic is Nintendo going after ROM sites again.

The whole thing with ROMs isn’t about an issue of legality when, that’s a clear cut thing. What isn’t concerns the relation of re-releases and ROMs. Emulators and ROMs are still popular, perhaps more than previously due to more accurate emulators being more available rather than junk like ZSNES. The increasing amount of fantranslations making games like Rudra no Hihou/ Treasure of Rudra available to the English-speaking audiences is reason enough to download whatever emulator seems to do the job and launch the game without any other considerations done. Then you have games that have changed graphics, completely overhauled game mechanics and pretty much everything under the sun you can think of. All you need to do is to patch the original ROM file and launch it in an emulator. Hell, even patching is optional, as most ROM sources simply list all known variants, patched or not, for any given title. Of course, some people just want to play Super Mario Bros.

Nintendo out of all companies probably has the most reason to dislike ROMs. Well, next to Sega. This is due to the fact how many classic titles exist on NES and SNES. As I’ve said before, any company who is releasing a title on a platform that allows the consumer to buy Super Mario Bros. 3 has high standards to live up against.

One of Wii’s most important lifelines was the Virtual Console. Titles on it outsell some of Nintendo’s big name titles, which didn’t put the Big N into right mindset. If you can’t obsolete a thirty years old game, then clearly something’s not right in the design and execution department. You may not be able to fight consumers’ nostalgia, but you can make see what makes that nostalgia ticking and tackle that. New Super Mario Bros. may have been rather mediocre after the fact, but after twenty year long drought of no 2D Mario it was a breeze of fresh air. Never went anywhere, and the New SMB titles ultimately lacked in quality.

The general consumer will drop five bucks for an old game in digital form, even more if the title’s a household name or holds some special place in his heart. The Virtual Console was a great thing, offering games across the platforms like no other. In the absence of Virtual Console, where does the consumer turn to? Without the older systems plugged in, and not too many have Wii or Wii U plugged in anymore, hardware emulation seems like the next best thing.

Nintendo of course has all the rights to protect their IPs and copyrights. Them shutting down Another Metroid 2 Remake a while back was them covering their asses and to remove competition from their own Metroid 2 remake. We can debate which one was better, but we can say for certain that AM2R was more faithful to the original and didn’t screw up the mechanics. Nintendo Switch Online is supposedly successor to the Virtual Console, but the concept and execution are a far cry from the store that Virtual Console is/was. NSO is essentially a subscription service to let you play online, with the whole thing about being able to play limited number of classic titles being a secondary element to it.

NSO is not a good replacement for the VC. VC wasn’t just about Nintendo’s own titles, but that may have been something that did rub them the wrong way. Nintendo wishes they had been as creative and innovative with their games as Sega was in their golden days, who constantly pushed the envelope with their groundbreaking arcade titles. The PC-Engine titles were a massive pull with the Japanese, with titles like The Kung Fu (known as China Warrior on the TruboGrafx-16) hitting the retro consensus there. There’s a market here that goes largely unused.

Nintendo could slap their in-house emulator for the Switch and sell every single NES game they own rights to for some three bucks. They’d probably make stupidly large amount of money off of them, probably more than what NSO could. Have all other companies that saw the success of Virtual Console hop aboard and have them re-release these title as well. Even better if you had opened this system to those who already had VC titles on the 3DS and could carry their games along just fine. This would have been beneficial and logical step for Nintendo on the long run, as it would have brought incredible amount of content to Switch from the get go.

An age-old argument against emulation from the industry has been that it damages the sales of future re-releases. VC was a massive success, PSN and XBLA’s retro titles slightly less so. Consumers will pay for what they like if its available at a decent price. Considering Nintendo is essentially ceasing its sales of older titles in order to move to Netflix styled subscription for them, the argument has less base than they want to believe.

All these companies know that they can’t stop emulation and piracy. It’s a losing battle, but all the companies have to do it. If they don’t, it’s very easy to see them fall into realm of abandonment and free for all to use. This extents to emulators being taken down as well. Only when patents expire does a company lose most control, like with the NES. When NES’ patent expired, the market saw a slight flood of clone consoles. The consoles themselves were legal, but some of them had build-in ROMs. This is often circumvented by just adding SD-card slot to the machine.

The retro game market is going to more expensive direction as the time go by, and it would be natural for the industry to take an advantage of this through re-releases and competent compilations. However, often we see budget packs with attention put to the presentation or alternative modes rather than on optimisation. Guess we’ll just have to wait and keep emulating before companies make older titles viable options again.

It’s Mega Time?

This week has seen slight avalanche of Mega Man related news. We’ve seen more gameplay and stages revealed from Mega Man 11, some  footage of the cartoon has been made available, a Rockman pachinko was announced and Rockman X Mega Mission is getting a States-side released.

To start with Mega Man 11, the one thing I mentioned early on was that it looked like it’d hit the spots with controls and add some neat new controls. To use an official source, check this gameplay in Fuse Man’s stage. Early on there is a showcase for change in the sliding mechanics that gives more control to the player, where previously sliding was more or less dedication motion to a direction. Now, you can change direction mid-slide. This is accompanied with slight yellow sparking and a sound effect. The reason why I’m pointing this separately is because this is detail quality is build on.

Should I also mention that enemy explosions are very 1980’s?

With the introduction of Power and Speed Gear the game’s core play has changed to a significant degree. Previously this sort of elements would’ve been relegated to supportive role and mostly as gimmick function. In Mega Man 11, the Gears are part of the core design to make stages and enemies easier. It would appear that neither of them are not required to complete the stages, but are used to make them significantly easier at places. This is an extremely welcome decision, as it means the core Mega Man play design is left untouched for those who would rather have purist approach to the game.

This doesn’t seem to extend to the bosses to certain extent. The Fuse Man Boss fight we see around 13 minute mark, the normal pattern is something that’s easy to deal with. Its power attack is specifically designed to be taken advantage of with the Speed Gear, though without a doubt a player can beat the boss without the use of it. However, saying that you don’t need to use it doesn’t null the fact that the bosses patterns and attacks are designed around the Gears to a degree, effectively making them additional weakness to the normal Rock-Paper-Scissor weapon cycle. This isn’t a negative in itself, as all this means the Gears are more or less completely integrated to the overall design rather than bolted on top of standard Mega Man design. On one hand, hopefully this won’t mean that future Mega Man games all share different important gimmicks jammed on top of them, but on the other hand, can the Gears be recycled into future titles with revisions to it? Is the Classic series to become like the X-series, where each game has a new gameplay mechanic in form of Gears to X‘s armours? We’ll have to see.

Otherwise, the game seems to be coming together just fine. The run cycle’s still a bit jarring and visuals are still rather plastic, but overall Mega Man 11 looks like its been carefully crafted to be a good entry in the series. You don’t need a million dollar budget for that.

To stick with “base” Mega Man for a bit, the whole thing with Pachislot Rockman came pretty much out of nowhere outside the rumours, but for Western audience this means jack shit. You’ll be playing this only in Japan, and we don’t even have a cabinet pictures, just few low-quality magazine scans and an announcement pdf. The designs are all over the place with this, combining elements from all the mainline series into one. This is easiest to see with Blues/ Proto Man there, as he has that hair from his Battle Network version and glasses look like Star Force‘s Rogue dropped them by, with the Life Gem on his forehead and chest being something that’s prevalent in the X-series. I’m interested in seeing how they’ll include Mega Man series’ elements into pachislot, and how garish the machine will end up being.

Speaking of Mega Man X, Capcom has hinted that Mega Man X9 will be a thing. With the X Legacy Collection hitting store shelves early in Japan, the manual mentions that the story isn’t over yet. Mega Man 11  was teased in a similar manner. It’s good that Capcom decided to pack all the X games into one package, as there’s less nostalgia for the newer games in the series to pull in the audience. Mega Man Legacy Collection should’ve been one package as well, with the Game Boy titles with it, but those won’t be re-released anytime soon outside Virtual Console. Hopefully they’ll drop most, if not all pretenses that there’s some sort of deep and meaningful story in the series and concentrate on making a damn fine game with Sigma as the final boss.

Udon has also procured the license for Mega Man X: Mega Mission, a one-shot Hitoshi Ariga adaptation of the Carddass series of the same name. Sadly, it’s in full colour, so we’re going to miss the intended gray scale. I’m guessing they’re doing this because the previously coloured Ariga Mega Man comics sold more than their untouched originals. If you’re interested in checking what the original story was about, The Reploid Research Lavatory has you covered.

Then we have the cartoon, fully titled as Mega Man: Fully Charged. While it looks slicker than previously and this particular trailer drops all of Mini-Mega, who we see more in the US region only preview, the show’s pretty much Cubix remade. It says Mega Man on the tin, they’re forcing sprite graphics to tell a story, they’re even using cues from Wily Castle I theme from Mega Man 2, and yet it doesn’t look or feel what you’d expect from a Mega Man cartoon. Then again, like a broken record I am, this isn’t exactly an adaptation. This takes the idea of a good boy robot fighting evil robots with some general resemblance to its namesake. However, the more there’s footage, the less impressive the whole show looks. Neither the 3D or the designs look impressive, but seeing this isn’t supposed to be anything groundbreaking, it’ll get the pass by the viewers.

All in all, Capcom is gearing Mega Man for the next few years, and depending how all this goes, the franchise may become relevant again. It won’t happen overnight, but maybe in few years if things keep at a steady pace and all good things are taken advantage of.

Consumer control over titles coming to Steam?

In hindsight, this was to come. Developer named Love in Space has stated that Valve has halted their title’s submission in order to overhaul Steam to give more control to the consumer on what they see. This isn’t the standard Family friendly control centre Steam currently has, but something more robust.

This seems to indicate two things. First, Valve is taking their hands off as they’ve mentioned previously and accept pretty much anything legal on Steam. This would mean the end developers have to indicate elements in their software whilst submitting to Valve. This would tie directly into the second element, which is the user driven control.

How do you implement it? is the  question.The best, quickest way would probably be to use the pre-existing tags Steam already uses for its titles, but whether or not these would be fitting is an open question. Sometimes, how a tag works for a title is rather obscure, referring to some element that’s not a major part in the title. Then you have the occasional tag that has nothing to do with the title. There would be a need for a far more stricter set of rules in order have a properly functioning control device. While possible that they’ll just use these tags, it’s also probable that something completely new will be used, as the aforementioned developer mentions that there is going to be completely new features that their title requires before Valve accepts it for Steam.

Was there a reason for a system like this? As Steam functions as a sales platform as much as it is a digital console, there is a need to split adult-only material from the more kid-friendly content. The split is similar how kids’ magazines are in one section in store, while all the rest are moved on the side or above the their stand. Another example would be how family movies and adult movies had different sections on a VHS rental store. Wasn’t the Family View already like this? Apparently not, as it seems to only limit what games are shown in the Library section rather in Store.

Seeing how the Internet really likes to rile people up and enjoy the outrage culture for better or worse, these last few years (or rather, last decade or so) has seen movements to accuse games, game developers and consumers for pretty much anything from sexism and racism to political agendas and lack of them. Valve has seen a lot of shit flung at them concerning their new policy, to the point of Kotaku labeling Valve irresponsible for allowing free market to decide on products.

This new feature that is being worked on is a solution that allows the user to censor their own Store page. This all fine and dandy, as this means people should be able to see what they want, ignoring the rest of the marketplace they might deem less of worth or somehow damaging for them or their family. As long as system does not force limitation to anyone else, or even suggest that certain content might be considered inappropriate, it should be passable.

However, it would seem this is a solution coming along way down, as Sekai Project mentioned some of their titles need to be re-submitted, and that they need to fill-in additional information for already passed software once the system has been implemented. Considering Valve has stopped accepting some titles like this for the time being, I’d guess they’re in a bit of a hurry with the system before publishers like Sekai find new avenues to move into. Valve wanting to put accepting software on hold for the time being until they’ve finished the system may be understandable, but it’s not the best approach concerning the publishers and developers who have their titles in this limbo state.

You will hear that this won’t solve any problems. Games that sites like Kotaku considers problematic won’t go away and will be developed and published. However, this is as good as any mediating solution, as the upcoming feature should allow these people can ignore their hated titles as much as they wish.

Disruptive pricing requires backing behind it

Here’s something I didn’t expect to see Shuhei Yoshida to use anytime soon; disruption. He jokes that that when the PlayStation 2 was released, it had no games to it, though Street Fighter EX 3 was published week before the console was launched.

The PS2 essendtially broke the barrier between previous home media formats like the VHS, Beta and Laserdisc and the DVD by introducing an affordable, competent player to the mass markets. An overnight industry revolution, some had put it back in the day. Sony had a product that wasn’t just cheap, but decently competitive too. It wasn’t the cutting edge player many people nowadays seem to think it was, but it was good enough. In fact, it was pretty terrible, and using the PS2 as a DVD player would kill the laser unit incredibly fast. This was part due to how it worked, and part due to Sony using cheap lasers units for their consoles.

Sony never learned from this. While it can’t be denied that the PS2 gained its initial success from the DVD market, the games themselves later made the console what it was. They were hoping to replicate this with the PlayStation 3 with the newfangled Blu-ray, but that didn’t go as expected. The stupid high price was made fun out of and the BD format took years to mature. It did manage to kill off HD-DVD though, so one win for Sony there. First time they beat someone in a format war, though this was also the time when people said that in few years digital-only content will be taking physical format for a ride. It’s been a slow burn with digital taking over the physical media, more than a decade at this point.

Yoshida seems to be missing something that’s been going over and over in the video game industry with his remarks about the PS2’s launch. An affordable, good enough machine that does its job well, but bleeding edge, will eclipse its competitors. There’s no large science behind it, people just dislike investing into an expensive machine. DVD players around the change of the millennium were stupendously expensive at their highest quality. They were, however, still cheaper than the Laserdisc by that point.

When Nintendo says that they’re not interested in doing or knowing how their competitors do stuff, Sony seems to be ones that don’t really learn from the history of an industry they’re not part of. Yoshida saying that they wouldn’t know how industry manages shift from one console to another spells us that they didn’t look up anyone who had been working with Sega, Nintendo, Atari, Hudson or NEC for some information. It sounds more like they went in cockeyed and hoped for the best. After all, the PlayStation had been the victor of the previous generation, beating both of its two main competitors. On one hand, Sony was in pressure to deliver a proper successor to their maiden console, and on the other hand they knew they had build a consumer base in the video game market that would surely follow in suit. Sony’s history with home media and electronics after was strong at that point, but after that it seems like video games took its toll on the company and they couldn’t compete with the current marker forces.

The Blu-Ray was the only time Sony won a format war, and even then it was more because there were only one other competing format. HD-DVD didn’t market itself very boldly, and most of Toshiba’s pricing was lacklustre to say the least. While it got decent studio backing, that backing came in too late compared to BD. Sony managed to get Warner Bros. support BD in an exclusive manner, and WalMart seeing writing on the wall, stopped offering HD-DVD due to lack of sales. Furthermore, the whole support Microsoft gave to the format to fight Sony’s BD was incredibly poor and never went anywhere. It’s more likely that PS3 didn’t contribute to BD’s win streak one bit. Sony’s history with their formats like the DSD, AVCHD and MiniDisc weren’t all that successful, though I must say MiniDisc still saw some success that should not be understated. Nowhere near the standards of the compact cassette or CD, but still.

Reiterating that you can’t simply disrupt a market with a cheap price. Cheap price in itself doesn’t tell anything about the product outside that you can buy it for less money. Disruption requires meat behind, something more substantial that drives the consumer towards a product. A relatively competent product with lower price than its competitors would be more on point with this. Something that larger amount of consumers can get their hands on and experience the higher fidelity of things is that sort of sweet spot, but it’s not easily attainable. It’s much easier to produce either trash products you can sell for large profit margin even when the price is lower than most, just as it is easy to put all the bleeding edge components into polished designed shell and sell it to high-tier enthusiasts, like hifi snobs, to enjoy.

Music of the Month; Metal Squad

You should go play some Thunderforce

If you’ve noticed the weird scheduling with these post as of late, it’s because I’ve been ill for the last few weeks, trying to push through work and other stuff all the while trying to keep myself on time with writing and all. Not that really matters in the end, though that did keep me from doing anything any reviews or robot related stuff this month, outside the Asimov Mega Man post.

Speaking of health, the game industry might be having yet another moral panic in its hands in the future, as the World Health Organisation has now officially released a diagnosis for what they call “gaming disorder.” I’ve discussed the ICD-11 previously, and the points still hold water. As Chris Ferguson says in his The Hill article, this is the first time WHO has marked a hobby as a disease. The most largest problem with the diagnosis is that it lacks clinical values and research itself was in poor science. When you have a diagnosis with no basis to it, you risk everyone’s health. Gaming addiction is a symptom of underlying problems, but it’s always easier to remove the tools rather than the root cause. A diagnosis like this will cause harm, especially to people who have found games as a hobby to cope with their mental issues. Sometimes, a good hobby is all it takes to keep a man straight.

As Ferguson mentions that WHO has been under pressure from Asian countries to solidify this diagnosis. Even without Ferguson’s examples, we can make an educated guess how China and South-Korea have been the spearheads in this.

While this isn’t the first time a medical diagnosis has been made public based on quackery and politics, it hurts three different fields at the same time. First, it makes WHO a laughable organisation that can’t keep with proper science or standards. They’re discrediting themselves and what they stand for with this. Secondly, it reduces the further confidence in psychology overall. Psychology has always been under fire about its science. It’s not rare to see people argue that psychology is not a science, outside the hard evidence biological psychology can yield. With this, psychology as a field can be ridiculed even further and puts mental illness classifications under question even more. Thirdly, WHO has damaged a hobby and has opened the door for further quacks to prey on patients, not to mention how hobbyists can now be treated as mentally addicted.

This is absolutely pathetic from WHO, and really puts them in a bad light. The topic really requires more writing on the subject, so we may return to video game addiction at a later date. May is a strong word here.

E3 also came and went earlier, and outside few interesting bits and bobs it was the usual show of ads for the audience. Devil May Cry 5 was probably the jawdropper of the show in overall terms. While expected, seeing it on the stage itself was bliss to the fans. However, like with any event like this, it’s good to remind ourselves that E3 is ultimately just a huge advertisement showcase. All the companies involved there are not for the benefit of the audience, but for the PR and fame. Self-evident for sure, maybe even a bit cynical, but it has become a sort of cornerstone in game marketing, where the biggest and best titles are revealed for the most effect possible. You can’t beat the PR you get from a stage show millions of people are watching at the same time around the globe, unhindered.

The relationship between the providers and consumers is pretty weird compared to other industries, as the general view seems to be that the developers and publishers are doing games for the consumer as some sort of favour, sacrificing themselves for the good of the game, when in reality it’s about the profit. Certainly, some developers have put themselves on a pedestal over things and do consider themselves as some sort of gift to the industry. I guess that’s human nature for you.

Human nature is also to be stupid, as EU is being with the upcoming Internet legislation. If you’re living inside the European Union, is do strongly hope you’ll check this site with some time and scribble an email for your MEPs to prevent widespread censorship. Hell, even this blog would go down if the legislation passes, and I like doing this shit.