Dead or Alive 6 might end up a rush job

I didn’t really mean to write about DoA‘s T&A again so soon, I’ve intentionally been skipping the subject with each new news item. Same with China slowly having an economy bubble bursting there, which I’ll hope to touch on Sunday. As it always turns out, DoA6‘s director Yohei Shimbori can’t seen to handle his spaghetti. The title’s already a PR nightmare when it comes to the fans, as they’re effectively being treated like dogs in the heat who need their nads cut off. On the other hand, it’s DoA, you can”t escape two decades worth of high fidelity graphics and extraordinary physics simulations for human body. Hell, the series was build on honking tits and beauty, don’t make me laugh.

This is where Shimbori’s sensibilities seem to be in, as he takes the credit/blame for the game’s visual design; it had too much fanservice. His aim is to show that DoA6 is a real fighting game, which is like saying you’re trying to showcase that a plate is a plate by changing the picture printed on it. Renewing the engine to another that lacks most physics elements DoA‘s previous titles had and made the games have a unique look. Now, with that latest Dynasty Warrior engine, everything’s so damn rigid. Argument that realism would drive home that DoA6‘s a real fighting game is also extremely stupid, as pretty much every fighting game out there looks unrealistic. Street Fighter has exaggerated hands and feet so the player can recognize them better, KoF has that picture-perfect Chinese beauty look to it (Christ how I need to write about this design aesthetic of theirs), Tekken has explody bits in the air and demon fighting all around with dude with pizzas on top of their heads and Guilty Gear has always has fantasy rock aesthetic to it. Realism? Fighting games don’t do realism. Well, maybe Virtua Fighter. Nobody ever questioned whether or not DoA was a fighting game series, but if Shimbori really was intending to raise the series to new heights, he would have stopped doing these platitudes and concentrated squarely on the gameplay. Screw damage modelling or using a new engine, fix the game gameplay to be less a copy of Virtua Fighter and something of its own instead.

Let’s not forget what Simbori originally said why they changed the looks of the game; he wanted it to look cool, after EVO players told they felt embarrassed playing the game. Looking behind the PR speech, it’s clear that the goal is to lessen the sex appeal of the franchise due to the flack it’s been getting, especially with Dead or Alive Xtreme 3. It’s either Shimbori wanting to cater both the EVO players and busybody jackasses who don’t have anything better than complain about digital tits, or his boss does. The way Shimbori’s replies and statements comes through with these interviews is like he can’t keep his story straight. He certainly wants to believe it all, but it’s far more likely there’s some corporate bullshit going on behind the scenes. Tecmo doesn’t want DoA to be a PR shitstorm again, despite it never really was. Again; only certain people bitch about it, and only certain grain-sized part of the audience feel embarrassed about the game. The rest don’t give a damn and just want to see the game to be true to the franchise and enjoy the visual flavour. Soul Calibur VI isn’t being petty with their body models, they’re going straight in where the sun don’t shine and make it look damn good.

Shimbori and the dev team have been in damage control mode since the initial launch trailer, there’s little doubt about that. The constant mantra Don’t worry, we haven’t show you all yet works exactly once, and then you need to showcase what you mean. Thus far, DoA6 hasn’t shown anything outside the norm. Hell, showcasing the norm has been an improvement in itself. While there was no doubts that most characters would return in their most iconic outfits, it says how weak their approach and attitude when instead of just saying the costumes are in and then showcasing them, Shimbori goes on about how the new designs will be more worldly because they’re inspired by American comics. Because y’know, Europe and the rest of the world don’t have their own comics going, especially China. There would be something in there if Shimboru would have used the comic book movies as an example, but he specifically meant the comics themselves from.

Do the game’s supposed to be launched in February 15th 2019. That’s not a whole lot time to develop it, considering the game was around 20% finished in August. Something will be missing from the title, and if modern fighting games are anything to go by, it wouldn’t be surprising if DoA6 ends up being just another platform to drive season on. The last few months will be all about trying to get the game produced to the point that it can be pressed, shipped and stocked. It’s more likely that the end of the year is their real deadline, the rest is trying to fix anything that doesn’t work.

I’ve been grinding the same gears with DoA6 for how many times now? This’ll be the last entry on the subject for now. Reality is that the campaigning against DoAX3 worked and Tecmo has changed their view on the franchise. The voice made heard was loud enough to cause backpedaling. Whatever the fans say or do at this point won’t change how DoA6 will be finished. All the stuff thus far added and changed have been nothing short of expected damage control. The only way for the consumer to say that this shit doesn’t fly is to make a clear-cut statement and voting with their wallets. None of the fans and core audience will do it though. Some will think that this is just one-time fling or that the series will return to its roots once the whole boobie-panic blows itself off. The history of the franchise or the long-time core audience doesn’t matter with this game. Only its PR fame and hoped higher revenues do.

VR has yet to break through

CEO of Unity Technologies John Riccitiello has a grasp on reality concerning both Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality kits. He was speaking at TechCrunch Disrupt held in San Fransisco this month and argued that there has yet to be a true launch of consumer grade VR and AR devices out there.

Price of course is his first point of contention, which is true. Looking at standard local prices, HTC Vive VR system costs 700€, with Oculus Rift being around 550€. That is extremely larger sum of money, especially when you remember that you need to have a computer to run it, adding to the cost if there’s a necessity to upgrade. You’re easily looking at a package worth a grand, which is far too much for just to set up a platform for extremely limited offering of software. VR will stay as an expensive piece of technology until computing technology, and technology in general, undergoes a massive advancement beyond headsets and screens. Computer Gaming Monthly’s prediction from 1991 that VR would be affordable in 1994 has been overshot by two and a half decades now and counting.

Second point is control and function. Riccitiello argues that the user does not have enough control over the systems. The way the input has been designed limits the content it can have. Most VR titles follow the same by-the-rules input and control method with the wands or controller. The best way to enjoy VR at this point is to get a full racing setup with wheel, pedals and a good seat to get the best experience out of it. As it stands now, both Oculus and Vive are using what essentially amounts to newer versions of Wiimotes.

Riccitiello is right that the current level of VR and AR technology is launched for developers. Game developers love to play with the latest technology and dabble with it to see what’s possible and what’s not. Nintendo is a good example of this in general, considering they’ve tried new things with their controllers throughout the years and included a 3D screen for the 3DS. All the tech stuff like this in Nintendo’s products are mainly intended for them to to explore, and the whole VR and AR boom follows the steps. Consumer end is not considered, only what they are interested in.

In Riccitiello’s mind, there has yet to be a commercial launch. The software that’s out there does not meet the expectations or the standards for consumer use. Better technology is worth jack shit if the games for the end-consumer are the exact same we had twenty years ago.

 


Ride the Comix was a VR game in Disney Quest attractions

The VR industry has grown for sure, but it has not expanded. It would appear that VR has a better market in commercial applications in general than consumer end. The Virtual Reality dream, a headset that could launch you into other worlds, does seem to be more a pipe dream than anything else. As I’ve mentioned previously, it is the 2010’s 3D television boom. However, unlike 3D TVs, this one will survive in some form due to the overall saturation of the market and the sheer force of the pipe dream. Ever since the Sensorama was out in the 1950’s, companies and developers have been aiming to realise something that would be “true” Virtual Reality.

If you take anything from this, VR and AR are nothing new and have half a century’s worth of development and commercial ventures behind it. This is the crux of it; all of it is technological research and development, and even then it’s all extremely limited in the end. Oculus’ latest tech shows what each new VR device has done; expanded on the technology rather than trying to find better ways to do VR.

What does this technological progress give to VR sets it already doesn’t have? To beat the dead horse; there needs to be progress in the software side more than in the hardware.

Is Riccitiello right in that consumer launch for VR has not been made yet? Perhaps not in the current generation, but VR history is full of consumer grade releases. VFX1 Headgear, Victormaxx Stuntmaster VR headset, Virtual Boy and Glasstron all were released for the consumer end, though they were not fully dedicated VR products on themselves. However, that’s where the whole evolution of software would come in, as showcased by Ride the Comix above.

Perhaps the largest crux on VR and AR is that there is no public discourse of them. When Oculus and Vive were new, they were the hottest shit around to talk about, and PSVR soon followed. Hell, some PSVR titles have been patched to work outside the VR goggles to increase sales.

Riccitiello’s positive view on that VR will keep rising is probably right, but the rise will be slow if things won’t change for the cheaper and more efficient. The expectations of the general consumer from what Virtual Reality should do not meet with what the developers’. That is not a blueprint for success, but for stagnation and at worst, failure.

No killer games for Olympics

A while back I discussed whether or not esports should get into the Olympics or not. I’ve been touching on the subject few times of during the past few years, throw Olympics to the search bar. Now, the Olympics committee has made a definite statement in negative, but for all the wrong reasons.

The International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach won’t allow video games, or esports for the matter, to enter the Olympics before violence is removed. To quote;

We cannot have in the Olympic program a game which is promoting violence or discrimination… …So-called killer games. They, from our point of view, are contradictory to the Olympic values and cannot therefore be accepted.

This is, of course, rather bullshit reason.

Games don’t promote violence. They may contain and even glorify it to some extent, but it no less play than any of combat sports. If we consider boxing and other harsher contact sports, electronic games are less violent than sports in general due to the lack of any sort of physical damage or contact. Visually, electronic games are more visceral for sure, but on comparison of promoting violence games and sports are not on the same level; sports has caused far more violence through the history than any game, even if we start counting only from the genesis of modern electronic games. This is no real argument of course, but it is an inane as what Bach offers.

As for discrimination, no electronic game promotes discrimination. I am sure this is more or less just showcasing how inclusive the Olympics is, but just as Bach’s own organisation, electronic gaming is all about how good you are. You won’t be getting into any teams or play over a championship if you don’t have the merit for it. Whether or not Bach truly believes that electronic games is dicks-only club, he couldn’t be more wrong. It’s just that men and women tend to like different kinds of games and there’s nothing wrong in that.

Furthermore, Bach says a game, which is rather interesting. If he finds a game that would truly promote violence and discrimination, then why not pick up another that doesn’t? This shouldn’t even be mentioned, but games can’t do either really, only their consumers and developers can. They are inanimate objects after all.

Killer game is rather old-fashioned way to describe any game with excessive killing and violence, essentially any modern R-18 title from God of War and Devil May Cry. Carmageddon and the like fall into this category as well. Anything with excessive killing, really.

Effectively, what Bach wants to get through, is that due to the visual nature of video games’ contest, they can’t be accepted to the Olympics. Well, outside him pandering the same shit everybody who seems to hit certain clique at his age, but that’s essentially what it is. He even boils it down to a point;

Of course every combat sport has its origins in a real fight among people… …But sport is the civilized expression about this. If you have egames where it’s about killing somebody, this cannot be brought into line with our Olympic values.

This is anthropomorphising games and game characters. While there is an applicable argument between the lines, games are about as much killing someone as any combat sport is. Nobody dies in an electronic game, they’re digital objects after all.

The true argument Bach makes is that the depiction of contest is uncivilised. To him and the committee, they’re a lesser sort of game to play. Make no mistake, this is a haughty high-stance they’re taking, considering the Olympics to be at the peak of cultural ladder near or at the top of the crowning position. The standards Bach sets up for electronic games can’t be met during his lifetime, simply due to the cultural gap between the people who consume sports and people who consume esports. There is overlap, make no exception, yet consider for a moment the stereotypical views about people who do and watch sports against people who play and watch electronic games. There you find what Bach drives after rather than the PR platitudes he puts out.

In the same breath, Kenneth Fok of Asian Electronic Sports Federation mentions American gun control and access to firearms to be part of the problem, which is another pandering platitude, which has no bearing on the subject. This comes just a shooting incident in a Madden tournament in Florida, twisting the two together despite both faulting the aforementioned rather than esports. While this blog shouldn’t take part into the whole gun control debate, it is far larger problem that ties deeper into society than just how guns are controlled. That is extremely easy and lazy way out to avoid the harsher issues that would take far longer time to sort out.

Whether or not esports got into the Olympics doesn’t matter, that’s not the issue here. The issue here is the continuing misconception about electronic games and violence, a discussion that has taken many forms in the culture. It’s not just electronic games either, considering violence and pinball were associated with each other, with the same applying to classic penny arcades and other similar establishments. The difference between high-class sports and everyday Joe’s coin cabinet in the cultural ladder and class difference can be felt in Bach’s argumentation. While some would see this a stretch, do keep in mind that electronic games, video games especially, are cultural continuation and carries the same spot in the general culture landscape as their predecessors. To put it rather harshly, let the peons play their games, the nobility shall play tennis.

It wold be possible for a game designed specifically for the Olympics to be accepted, but that’d be putting the merits of video games into question as legit format on their own. Even more so as an art form. Rather than trying to appeal to the Olympics or other similar events and organisations for legitimacy considering gaming, gaming should keep trucking forwards and find itself properly. Despite what Bach wants to think, gaming is, ultimately, just as civilised activity as sports.

Sega’s Mania effect

So after couple of decades of failed starts, concepts thrown around and DMCA’d fan titles, Streets of Rage 4 is a thing that’s coming out. Finally, might I add. Sega and Streets of Rage fans, rejoice.

 

I have to say, these redesigns are pretty damn nice

There are three companies involved with the game, outside Sega as the licensee; Lizardcube, who were in charge of the recent Wonder Boy: The Dragon’s Trap; Guard Crush Games who have a history with beat-em-ups (or belt-scrolling action games if you’re Japanese) like Streets of Fury; Dotemu, who function as a publisher. Lizardcube is in charge of graphics, while Guard Crush Games handles the programming, though Dotemu has the handle on game design. This is pretty nice package, as Lizardcube has a pretty nice, French comics style that fits so many of these older titles’ revival, and Guard Crush Games seems to have a handle on programming just fine. Y’know, the hardest part of making a game.

I’m probably going to make a comparative post regarding the character designs, because both Axel and Blaze got a real nice new lick of paint.

There is exactly two things this game needs to do in order to be accepted by long time fans and be at least a relative hit with the general audience; faithfully replicate the Streets of Rage formula, and expand on it. This is effectively what Sonic Mania did, and it has been hailed as the best Sonic the Hedhehog game to date, which isn’t too hard to accept.

Which raises the question; did Sonic Mania‘s success kick this title off the ground? Both it and the new Wonder Boy were well received and raised new interest in certain section of older titles. Both of them function as data to further the idea putting the money and effort to realise a Streets of Rage title in its proper 2D mould rather than take the Final Fight route with Streetwise. After all, game genres don’t just die because new technology makes new genres possible with extra dimensions or additional gimmicks like VR. Despite how 90’s marketing wants you to believe, 2D hasn’t gone anywhere at any point. Sure, you the newfangled thing always gets pushed, but you can’t deny the customers the things they want. Just look at how well 2D Mario sells over 3D titles. That’s another dead horse I need to stop kicking.

All this data of revival games doing at least decently well is most probable reason Streets of Rage 4 got greenlit. Add Mega Man 11‘s upcoming release to the mix and we’re entering an interesting era, where old franchises are getting new releases in more budget range, but with none of the lacking elements. Hopefully more companies realise this; you don’t need AAA budget to make great damn games. Pretty much all of these classic franchises could be revived and developed at a fraction of the cost with modern tools. Easier to make profits. The only real problem is to deliver a wanted product, which didn’t really happen with the New SMB series after the first few entries. Once a franchise is revived, it needs to move forwards. Mega Man 10 failed in this term by simply being same thing again. We now have three Mega Man 2 games and that’s two too much.

Sega of course wouldn’t develop this themselves. They don’t care about the IP. Sega hasn’t given two shits about Streets of Rage since the mid-90’s, when they essentially gave the middle finger to the Western consumers. Eternal Champions used to be a big thing, but then Sega just neutered it. You can’t treat Japanese, American and European markets the same. Hell, you have to treat Europe as multiple market zones if you want to do it right. This was clear how Sega’s tactics with the Genesis in the US region only kicked off after the US branch pushed through their tactics of including a game with the console and marketing Sonic the Hedgehog their own way. If most of the data is to be believed, Sonic‘s been the most popular in the US. Sadly, Sega of Japan’s management killed all the motion their American and European sections had going on, effectively beginning their own downfall from grace. Westerners do classic Sega better than Sega themselves.

Streets of Rage 4 probably won’t be as large a success as Sonic Mania. If the game gets a physical release afterwards its initial digital showcase, we can deem it successful enough. If it gets a physical release from the very beginning, even if it was a Limited Run title, then the developers and publisher have boatloads of trust towards their targeted consumers. There are enough Sega fans that would purchase this title in an instant.

While Sonic Mania was clearly an international title, a game that didn’t have any specific region in mind, the same can’t be said about Streets of Rage 4. Both Guard Crush Games and Lizardcube are European companies, and that flavours oozes through in a very positive manner. Hell, even Dotemu is based on France. I hope they shower more than the average French. However, that probably will rub some people off, as Streets of Rage originally had a very American atmosphere to it, especially considering it was inspired partially by Streets of Fire. Hell, Blaze’s design is essentially Ellen Aim with more streetwise to her. The bits about Sega not giving a damn about the IP still stands, and their actions towards Western markets have been changing only during the last years. The Yakuza franchise is a good line to follow modern Sega in this. English dubbing usually drives sales, but there are titles where this isn’t case. Yakuza dropped this in favour of cheaper releases and simply because the fans didn’t like it. Despite Sega censoring and removing elements from some of the games, the audience kept growing. Despite this, none of the spin-offs outside the zombie romp got localised. Now that the Western audience has grown far greater, Sega’s taken the series’ position in the market into notion with better releases, and now is even considering publishing further remasters and spin-offs in the Overseas regions. Sega of Japan is slowly but surely taking a notion of Western markets.

If we’re going to go down this path, it’s relatively easy to see Sega considering the wants and needs of the Western markets to some extent. The IPs they’ve been giving up and ignoring still have a strong consumer base with nothing to fill that niche. A high quality title here and there goes long way in making profits and keeping your fans happy. I would say Altered Beast and Golden Axe could be next on the list of revivals, but seeing how terrible their last titles were, there’d be a lot of work to fix those damages in the eyes of Sega themselves.

Subscription service as the future of video games?

Screw the blog personality for this post. We’re doing this in-person. Shigsy had an interview with Bloomberg, where he warns other video game developers about greed. This is rich, coming from a dev who can do whatever the hell he wants rather than doing titles that the market has yearned for some time. It’s no secret 2D Mario titles sell more than 3D ones, but they’re too much work and bothersome to design. He’d rather have games developed like a school project.

Shigsy doesn’t really say anything especially worthwhile. His criticism on F2P and lootboxes echoes so many others, and you can read between the lines how there is irritation about mobile games with gacha are making tons of money. Fate Grand Order or whatever it was is making millions per day, supposedly. Shigsy saying the fixed-cost model hasn’t been a success is bullshit though. Something that has worked for pretty much everything thus far doesn’t suddenly become unsuccessful just it seems to be under fire now. Sure, Shigsy talks mostly in context of mobile gaming. Nintendo tackling mobile games has been criticised for good reasons, as the market is widely different from console game market. It’s like entering a market selling pizzas with hamburgers. There is a reason why Nintendo’s IPs on computers has always been handled by other companies, like Hudson with Super Mario Bros. Special.

Shigsy clearly likes the idea of subscription based gaming, like how Netflix is for movies and TV shows. To him, how games have been sold thus far seems to have failed despite gaming has become larger than Hollywood through it. F2P games with in-game purchases is greedy way to make profit to him, but this is business. You make money the best way you can. Subbing services on the other hand would still have the consumer pay a front fee to access titles to begin with, but just as with Netflix and other of its competitors, the question about what games would be available. Nintendo’s upcoming service for the Switch is abysmal in this, as the game variety they’re offering is extremely limited. A subbing service requires to have extremely wide variety of titles, and having something else than the same NES titles over and over.

It’s trite for Shigsy to argue for Nintendo wanting to bring their games to widest possible audience via mobile games. If Nintendo truly wanted to do this, they’re start doing third party games for Microsoft and Sony. That’s not going to happen, so what they’re really about with mobile games is cross-platform advertising. Show people who play games on mobile phones how great titles Nintendo has with selected IPs, and maybe some of them will be interested enough to jump the bandwagon with Switch.

This has been Nintendo’s strategy with across media platforms and consumables before as well. All the cartoons, toys, cereals, comics and so on were only to promote Nintendo’s games and consoles. Mobile phone games are the exact same thing, as their primary value is to advertise the brands and IPs instead of raking money on themselves.

I’m almost baffled how Shigsy thinks there isn’t already a culture of paying for valued software. Your normal everyday person doesn’t have thousands or millions to blow money on games. Hell, most people don’t even put hundreds into games. Outside some stupidly obsessed people, consumers have a very strong tendency on purchasing products they deem worthy. Nobody simply blows their cash on whatever kind of products if they can help.

Considering Nintendo of Japan seems to has jack shit understanding about global market, I wouldn’t be surprised if this wasn’t one of Shigsy’s and Nintendo’s brain farts how consumers act. The main reason why Fire Emblem and Famicom Wars never hit the West before GBA was because Nintendo’s staff thought Americans didn’t like strategy games, despite PCs being filled with them. Then again, this probably is partially true due to how most successful strategy games have been on PC, and we’ve seen, Nintendo didn’t deal in the PC market. Nevertheless, Advance Wars became more popular in the West than in Japan. Then you had Nintendo’s official, can’t remember who, proudly mentioning how Japanese children loved to craft and play with cardboard. Honestly, Nintendo’s corporate culture in this sense has their heads deep in their asses. This line really should be read that Shigsy wants a culture where games he values would be purchased. I bet he is still salty about Donkey Kong Country being the breakthrough title for the Super Nintendo.

Consumers already have a habit of paying money for applications and software  they deem worth the money. Trying to act like this is not the case goes against reality. If this is some sort of jab at piracy and how Nintendo has been fighting against ROMs and the like as of late, it further shows how out of loop he and the rest of the company is. Virtual Console was a massive success to the point of titles outselling new games Nintendo was putting out. There is a market for these older titles, hence why people are willing to pirate and play ROMs. This the same reason why the Classic Mini systems are selling like hotcakes. By not offering a way for consumers to purchase and access them is effectively shooting yourself to the leg and not offering software people are willing to pay for. This isn’t any goddamn rocket science. The habit Shigsy wants consumers to have is already there, but they’re not willing to provide the software. On the contrary, they’ve killed all avenues to obtain these titles. Furthermore, piracy has promoted products far more than any other field; it is not an outright negative impact in itself. A pirated title is not a lost sale, as the case often is that there was no intention to purchase that title in the first place. Comparison with music streaming is false equivalency but its the best Shigsy can muster. You can’t play games Youtube either, so into the trash with it.

Does changing things into Netflix-like subbing service change anything in this? Of course not. If the library of games is lacklustre compared to other similar services, or even outright stores, you won’t see customers subbing. The price has to be low enough to warrant subbing to it as well, and lose all rights to the games. Never underestimate customers’ will to have ownership over what they’ve paid.

How should games grow up?

This will be musings piece, as I’ll outright state that there is no real right answer to the question, and this post really goes just line down. Many times over the past decade I’ve seen writings and demands for video and computer games to grow up, to mature as a media. More often than not the claim is that games should be able to handle hard and difficult subjects. Of course, what these subjects are varies from person to person and group to group, as we all know how political opposites can sometimes be completely at heads with each other to the point of gaining the same overall end result. Then you have the issue of handling a difficult subject in a game is often through the use of player independent narrative, which could be done in any other medium. After all, themes and subjects are simply framing devices for a game. That is not to say framing devices are unimportant, just the opposite.

If we continue this line, discussing hard and heavy issues through games is not something new. It may be new to audiences and generations that did not play the Ultima games or other similar classics. Ultima‘s second trilogy is, after all, a series that discusses human virtues in philosophical manner and how they affect human nature, but also how easily these virtues can be twisted and mangled for extremes. While nothing spectacular on the grand scheme of things, it would be incorrect to think that gaming has not touched upon serious subjects.

It just might not be a subject someone in particular cares about.

Then, who decides what would be a subject hard and tough enough for gaming to trek into? Naturally, the developer, or the writer or the director would be the person who would make the call. In reality, someone with more power over the product, a publisher or executive, probably can have heavier say on the subject than many are willing to use. After all, games are mass entertainment and not confined to any specific audience. Thus, would it be the consumers at large who would get to decide what would the topics be? It would be impossible to make any sort of voting system that would work, the press would simply mangle messages back and forth for various reasons, and sadly developers and their publishers would only listen to the clique they’re most invested in and the people who yell the loudest. Clearly we need to have some separation between the provider and consumer, in which the developers have the best opportunity to make use of their God given skill and knowhow to analyse the market at large without resorting to media bogus or loudmouths. High hopes, I know.

If we’d follow this, then what would be considered a tough subject would depend on the general consensus of a given area, country or culture. After all, cultures and people differ from each other enough so that we can say some subjects are drastically more taboo in some, while completely in the open in others. There’s also gradual change in the topics, so a game with a long development cycle might be out of date in its themes when it gets out.

This of course leads to the question if a game with certain subjects, and themes, should then be published in a region where the content would be considered taboo? Should it get censored or should it stand free as a piece of its origin culture? If we follow the the idea of games being art, the less they are touched the better, meaning no censorship or content changes should be applied. On the other hand, games are commercial products that should make money, and sometimes changing stuff for the local market is sure way to make more dosh. Both of these can backfire, especially if a title with a significant underground following suddenly finds their object of mania lacking in all of those interesting elements.

Perhaps the themes and subjects themselves are not the important factor, ultimately. Choosing your audience and target consumer groups with your choice does carry a heavy weight, but not perhaps as much as the content itself. Content, of course, is the game play itself, rather than any of the frames. If the frames overtake the content, you’ll more likely than not end up with a cold turkey in your hands. While the game press likes to talk about the importance of story and its themes in games, the cold reality is that games sell more on their intrinsic nature as games far more.

There are some off titles that do mix its carrying hefty themes into the game’s play rather than just presenting talking heads to the player. Perhaps this would be path for gaming to take, and slowly phase away from literary and film techniques. After all, film essentially stems off from theater in many ways, but theater acting does not translate very well towards the camera, or vice versa. Literacy is word written down, yet text has its own ways that speech can’t convey. Naturally, this also applies the other way around. Thus, I have to come to an old argument I tend to present; games should find their own way of doing this, independent of films and text. As much as the two older medium have managed to find their own way throughout the ages, video and computer games still have ways to go. The media’s still young, despite few generations now born in a world where gaming is ever-present. In order games to incorporate themes and topics into the play of the game in wholesale way rather than in more traditional approaches, then there’s a need to further whatever the core element of electronic gaming; playing. The ways to do it are probably just as many as there are games under the Sun, but sometimes it’d be best to take a step back and look at the whole history of games and get to the bottom how to improve them in the future.

Music of the Month; Give it a Shot


Funny that, this is the best song on the album. Otherwise it’s extremely disappointing

Generally speaking, I don’t do music album reviews, but for this once I’ll do a short exception; Rockman X Anniversary Collection Soundtrack is not worth the price. Outside the two versions of Give it a Shot and RE;FUTURE, the album’s pretty bland. Spending track space and time to remix six first games’ Boss Battle themes. These were clearly chosen because they could been easily selected over stage themes. If we’re completely frank, the Boss Battle themes are not the best parts of Mega Man series’ soundtracks. Most of these songs simply end up being grey background noise. This is a far cry from previous releases’ quality, like Chiptuned Rockman.

Speaking of reviews, you got two last month. I’m not exactly happy how either of them turned out (though I never am with my posts) and I know the end result of the Muv-Luv Kickstarter goods did give rather negative view. However, that’s mostly due to how high standards I tend to use in my reviews. If there’s something I see that could or should have been included or improved, I aim to mention it. If there’s a point of comparison to be made for improvements, I always aim to make that comparison. In that, the aim often is to give constructive criticism, the kind of I’d want to have. It’s no use calling things shit or terrible, it ultimately ends up meaningless jabber. While improvement suggestions are always welcome, those should never be expected unless separately requested. This may sound harsh, but the reasons why something may be lacking don’t matter, as this can lead into further questions. Too many times I’ve seen and experienced people pointing the lack of experience for a reason why something is lacking in design, which always follows with questions like Why didn’t you hire a professional then? or Why didn’t you find professional to help? The reasons, ultimately, don’t matter. They can make interesting trivia though.

The JoyCon review was approached the same way. However, a controller review has to take into account ergonomics, and this breaks the whole Why isn’t necessary question thing into the air. There I tend to look for why certain shapes were made in the form they are, and often the answer is to conform to the general shapes of hands. It’s not exactly the same question or reason, but close enough for some people to bring the point up.

Pachislot Rockman got announced and we’ve got our first look at some the characters somewhat recently. I’ll be doing a comparative review of Mega Man’s redesign, just like how I did one on the Man of Action cartoon design. While we don’t have multiple angles to use, the one in the linked page is more or less enough to get a good feeling what elements were incorporated across the franchise. Pachislot and pachinko machines tend to redesign characters, sometimes to very large extents, but often do keep the core aspects intact. To use an example, CR Cutie Honey has designs that combine some previous series’ entries into one with healthy dose of detailing. People who handled this knew what they were doing as well, as the bunny girl form is named Cutie Bunny.

As for the rest of the month, I’m planning a short overview on what are Lunatic Dawn and Exogularity booklets âge is self-publishing at Comiket. I should not be surprised that the fandom seems to have taken Exogularity as the title for some story or setting, when in reality Exogularity is rebranded Lunatic Dawn. Well, I guess that’s it, they’re both source books with different names. The actual post will have examples, of course, but that’s the gist of it.

You’ve probably noticed how weekend posts have been appearing on Sundays recently rather than on Fridays. This is me moving towards the new schedule I mentioned a month ago or so. I’ll take this chance to also mention that there’s no post next weekend, as I’ll be away. Truth to be told, I intended to write this post for Friday, but thanks to rain I fell ill. My fever’s not going down, and I’m actually writing this on a phone. You can see the irony here, as I’m giving you a Why despite my arguments above stating the contradictory. Well, I do think there’s a wide gap between a KS and this blog.

Remember to sharpen and oil your kitchen knives and such. Cooking will be much safer and enjoyable afterwards.