Review: Rev-O-Mate

When I purchased the Huion tablet for digital drawing and painting last year, an uncomfortable reality did set in; my large keyboard was more or less unusable due to the position of the tablet itself in front of it. Sure, I rearranged by table few times over to find new ways to access the keys, but ultimately the size of things simply didn’t allow much leeway, especially due to the screen size of the tablet itself. Hence, I had a need for something I could use as a helping device whenever I would draw, which I haven’t had much time for due to my dayjob. Learning something like this from scratch while having a lifetime of ways mixing with everything is hard to say the least.

Bit Trade One’s Rev-O-Mate’s Kickstarter thus came out at a good time. The device had the things I personally was looking for. Certainly a number of game keypads would’ve been an option, though everything about them seemed off. Extremely high price at points, unnecessary design elements everywhere, large size and lacking software at times, I was more than hesitant on purchasing one. Rev-O-Mate seemed to be all that I was looking for, a small device with complete freedom to customise its buttons to my heart’s content. All things considered, its simplicity should be enough to meet expectations. I ended up backing the base version with none of the bells or whistles added.

A small device that fits your palm, around 64mm in base diameter and 41mm height, or 2 33/64 inch w and 1 39/64 inch h. The weight is pretty spot on at 180g, when you take into consideration the extra 20-30g the cord pulls

First things first, the design and construction. It’s what you’d expect from a tightly constructed piece, with one exception; the wheel. While all the buttons feel extremely sturdy with their one-click nature, the large wheel on the top has designed looseness to it. It wobbles back and forth a bit. Most wheels of its nature have this wobble, but it does feel slightly cheap at first. When in proper use, its goes unnoticed, but its still there.

The wheel surface itself is machined, with the swirls on top and on the side. This gives it a nice texture, though the edges of the chamfer could have used ever so slight rounding, but this would have extended the machining cost unnecessarily. The base has a kind of spattered texture on it, giving it a distinct touch from the wheel. The base has a translucent bottom to allow lights shine on the sides, while having a cut spot for a good grip base. Just remember to take the plastic film off first. This surface will keep Rev-O-Mate decently positioned, unless the bottom is unclean or you exert further force on it.

The camera picks the light in a very different way from actuality

The cord gets a special mention for using being braided and being rather sturdy, it is something that companies usually save money in, but Rev-O-Mate’s cord is better than the standard.

There are ten buttons around the wheel, all which need to be customised before the device does anything. With three different sets of profiles, this brings the total number of buttons on the device to 33. The wheel itself is a button as well, which probably contributes to the whole wobbling bit. If we dedicate one button from profile change in each profile, that gives us thirty buttons for quick access, which is quite a lot. Each button have a damn fine tactile feeling to them, and the wheel’s button has a very satisfactory ‘thump’ to it.

The round nature of the device has a surprising benefit. It can essentially function in any position, the cord being the only obstacle. Whether or not by design or chance, its revolving nature allows the user to find the most suitable angle for the buttons for themselves, something game keypads don’t really allow. The buttons themselves are hard plastic, something that some may find slightly uncomfortable, especially with the two marked buttons. However, this is a better solution than rubber buttons on the long run, as they’re now sturdy and can take some beating.

I’ve dedicated the wheel button for profile change in each profile iteration

I always dread setting up these things, because I have no idea what I have need for, thus I end up setting buttons as I go along. These, however, are the initial buttons I set up from the very beginning. Each button, and the wheel itself, can be changed to whatever function.

As you can see, there are currently preset functions for the three most popular programs for illustrators and digital painters, or fuckups like me

This how the binding window currently looks like from presets. Bit Trade One is working on updating the software and firmware, and have rolled new versions already. Just make sure you’re using USB 2.0 or USB 1.1. Type A to connect, as it doesn’t seem to like USB 3.0 connection. Of course, creating a macro for your use has a separate selection.

As you can see, I currently lack any macros. If we were to make a macro of CTRL+Z, the recording would appear as such.

 

Seeing how the program records even the time span an input was held is unexpected but wholly welcome. This is as powerful macro creation tool as you’d expect and works with games as well.

The lights themselves can be customised from the top row with RGB values, giving them whatever colour you wish for. The teal I have there comes out as rather cold blue, as you can see. The lights change as they are being customised though, so you get an immediate response. You can also determine how long they’re lit up and at what point, or completely turn them off. There are three levels or brightness to choose from, and the images you see here are for the the medium, standard brightness.

 

The LEDs used run on unknown frequency, which you notice when you move the device around and observe the base. This frequency does not sync up with a camera at normal 23 to 30 FPS, making it look like the the base is on fire or trying to launch itself.

You can also have fun with an additional source of LED lights and cause further flicker

While I’m not very keen on unboxing, the box really came just with the device and few slips. Not even a preliminary version of the software on disc. Everything had to be downloaded from their website. While a solid cost cutting measure for sure, this does make the package overall feel a bit cheap. Maybe the retailer version will have an updated software bundled with it. The manual itself is very short, which is understandable as there isn’t much to talk about the device itself. The lack of different keyboard support is expected, though unfortunate. Most of the world will do just fine by having the US keyboard set up, though French AZERTY users probably will find it a nuisance.

The back of the box has some slight Engrish on it

All in all, Rev-O-Mate is what perfect in what its set up to be; a rotary device with macro buttons. I’ve also used it as a paddle controller with few Breakout clones, and it does its job in this part decently as well.