Music of the Month; Daddy Mulk


What an unfortunate name for a Zuntata song. From 1990 live show. The MaiMai+ has an excellent groove remix of this same song

This’ll probably be a short post, I’ve got only one or two planned posts for the month. Those who follow the blog for the Guilty Gear character design comparisons, I’ll be aiming to do one per month from now on, including the ones I did as a bunch prior to release of Xrd. With the models in the game being available to us, I can do a much more throughout view on what’s been changed. Someone like Sol probably will run short while someone like Potemkin will end up a catch-this-detail-here kind of post. Not the best kind of design comparison. Jam and Dizzy really had the benefit that they were upgrades from the previous designs. Someone like Millia at first appears to have completely and drastic redesign, but in reality the silhouette has stayed largely the same. You’d be surprised how much time I can sink into stupidly simple posts like that, but I guess that means I put either put too much effort in them for no reason or there’s just so much things to go through.

The second planned post is hardware related. While the most popular mod for the original Game Boy Advance is the backlit screen installation, there are surprisingly sparse amount of guides with photos. Sure, there’s a semi-official PDF that shows how its done with pretty graphics, but nothing beats good ol’ photo. Consider it a review to boot, considering the mod has become popular again with the reproduction screens becoming more and more available. I already have one modded GBA, which was more or less a test run, but I forgot to take pictures. The main problem I encountered with the mod was the new shell/housing I ordered with it. Being a third party product, the producers probably didn’t take shrinkage into account, or at least not fully. When plastic sets in after casting, it shrinks from its original volume a little bit, usually just few percents, which can cause problems if your product’s mould is taken from an actual shell. However, there are some sellers on the ‘net who seem to have access to some versions of the original moulds, though why Nintendo didn’t order them back or be junked is beyond me. Then again, what do they care, they’re not making any money on a product almost two decades old anymore.

As for robot posts, I got pretty burned early in the year with the Virtual-On posts. I did intend to follow up soon with TSF related stuff, but things just didn’t go as intended. Looking at the folders, I’ve got a MiG-29 and Tornado lined up, but whether or not I can find any proper illustrations on either is bit up in the air. MiG-29 has B/W lineart, so that’ll probably have to do, alongside possible photos from toys and such. However, the MiG-29 is pretty close to MiG-29OVT, with the only real difference being thrusters on the shoulders. Hence, why Tornado is the more probable option, depending on what sources I can find for it. I could always go with the in-game CGs, but I still want to avoid that.

As for âge stuff, there still isn’t particular I’d like to touch upon. While the updates from the Kickstarter are sparse, things are rolling slowly, but surely. Perhaps I’d need to write more about stuff from Exogularity 01 for the kicks of it.

I’ve mentioned before that I may need to drop blog to one post per week. That is closely becoming a reality, though not by my own volition. It’s all about simple physical fatigue and mind being elsewhere on work. That said, I’ll probably coerce certain someone to do a design historical on certain wolf monster.

And oh, happy May Day.

 

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Review of the Month: Dariusburst Chronicle Saviours Limited Edition/s

I was to review Huion GT-220 Ver.2 this month, but I realised that I’d need a lot more time with it before saying anything solid about it. Next month then. The second options was to review the tat that came with Dariusburst Chronicle Saviours Limited Edition package. I’m doing it a double though, reviewing both the Japanese Vita release and the PlayStation 4 Limited Run release. Let’s get on with the show then.

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The Japanese Vita release is a big box
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Limited Run’s box is essentially a carbon copy of the Japanese PS4 LE release

I have to start with the covers, because these things are pretty sweet. There are few iconic themes and illustrations with the Dariusburst sub-series, and both boxes do the game justice. Both portray the Legend and Next ship that defined the original Dariusburst with new takes on the classic bosses. It’s also nice to see some bigbox releases this day and age, even when it’s just for limited release products.

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Overall, the layout of the box is pretty good. Darius Odyssey, the book on the information of the whole series with an emphasize on the bosses, lays on top of the game case and music CD. While it would’ve been preferable to have the book behind the game and the disc so that you’d have a faster access to the game case, this is a doable solution.

Darius Odussey is a superb book. If you’re a fan of the franchise and have a preference for books of this nature, finding yourself one would something to consider about. Of course, there is a language barrier to consider about. Even if your linguistic skills aren’t up to the task, the pictures are nice.

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I had to edit my fingers out

The paper used is glossy, as per usual for these releases. This also means the page’s corners are easy to damage, and mine got a bit crunched from the sides during transit, meaning the base packaging itself is insufficient.

The music CD the Vita LE comes with is Original Arrange Soundtrack. It doesn’t contain any original tracks from the game itself, but contains music used for DLC stuff, meaning you’re missing a lot of good Zuntata music. While it can be understood, as the main soundtrack itself is sold separately and Zuntata really makes some decent dough on those, it would have been nice to have some Darius. I’ve got no qualms about having music from Space Harrier and Night Striker, which has a godly track titled Emergency Order, there is something amiss here. It’s nothing notable, but as far as included soundtracks goes, it misses the point a bit.

Overall, the Japanese Vita release was worth the money. Darius Odyssey was the money grabber in this one without a doubt. It makes an interesting conversation piece when your guests realise that all of the bosses have a seafood theme to them, and then you can proceed to wow them with your knowledge on mechanised sushi.

Limited Run’s PlayStation 4 release offers different contents, like the Japanese PS4 release.

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Uh, I’m not sure if they were arranged like this

You don’t see them, but bunch of Dariusburst CS capsule toys were stashed beneath both of these cases. The PS4 case may seem like something it would slide down in a moment, but they’ve managed to play the millimetre game well enough and it keeps the game’s case in place well enough.

There is no book this time around, but the Arrange Album is a new one. Again, we can DLC music from games like Death Smiles and Battle Garegga, of which Battle Garegga has an excellent remix of Into the Leaden Clouds. However, unlike with the Arrange Album in the Vita release, this sequel album has some songs from Darius games. They’ve been heavily arranged and carry individual composer’s tunes instead of relying on Zuntata’s own melodic trademarks. Both Arrange Albums are worth to listen to at least once and pick up your personal favourites from them, but I would recommend against purchasing either Limited Edition solely because of these music albums.

The game case is nothing special, but the main attraction of this piece is the two Silver Hawk capsule toys. Which is kinda backwards, because these two are just packed pieces of Shooting Game Historica toys and carry all the flaws a cheaply manufactured quick-pack toys have.

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The stand’s a huge upgrade from the original Silver Hawk figures from the first Shooting Game Historica

Limited Run’s Limited Edition came with Player 1 and 2 colours while the Japanese PS4 Limited Edition came with Player 3 and 4 colours. Whether or not they had a rerun or this release was provided from an excess stock is unknown, but ultimately this doesn’t matter. While I’m sure most people want the Red and Blue Silver Hawks, the P3 and P4 colours are now the rarer ones.

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Wings and cockpit were delivered in separate bags, as per capsule toys standards

The overall mould is good, but like with all toys like these, the tolerances are rather big. There are numerous spots where the pieces don’t align straight with each other without the use of glue, which I would recommend anyway.

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Because the tolerances are so high, the cockpit doesn’t sit in. You can see how it is turning to the right to the extent of the back right bit resting against the top. The turret on the left is also bending outwards due to cheap plastic used, though this is not a rare things with capsule toys. The cheapness also shows in the paintjob.

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Not the worst, not the best, but quality that doesn’t belong to a Limited Edition title

The cockpit is moulded in transparent blue plastic and then painted over with silver and red, or blue in the case of P2 colours. Due to the tolerances, the paint application is sloppy and the cockpit’s windscreen doesn’t come through as well as it should. It looks pretty terrible, and it would’ve been better if the windscreen was painted.

To be completely serious, the figures are a major letdown. Of course they wouldn’t make a new mould for this when you could cheap your ass out with this, but seeing the Japanese release did the same, it’s not exactly Limited Run’s fault. However, I would argue that Degica should’ve trumped the Japanese release and should have opted for the model kit of Silver Hawk. It might’ve had raised the price a bit, but it would’ve crowned the release. Now it’s just a drag.

Between the two releases, the Vita release gets a stamp of recommendation simply based on the book. However, it should be noted that PS4 version does have the book included as an extra on-disc that you can access in-game, but the most baffling part of this that the book’s completely untranslated. This is a significant miss on Degica’s part. The staff handling this project should have realised that they’d need to put the effort to translate it, though Degica and translations don’t really meet half-way through, it would seem.

However, if the book doesn’t look like your thing, then you’d better off with the standard release from Japan, or one of the digital options. It’ll be cheaper, and you won’t have a huge box taking your shelf space.

Or pick up Odin Sphere Leifthrasir ‘s limited edition for fifty quid on Amazon UK if you want a good limited release package.