Virtual-On Historical: Operation Moongate

Virtual-On is one of Sega’s hallmark game franchises, developed by Sega’s AM3 department. It had everything the arcades required in 1996; 3D graphics that you wouldn’t see at home, unique controls, flashy graphics and fast paced gameplay. When most of the 3D mecha combat games on the market aimed for slow and emphasized on realistic simulation, like Shattered Metal or Mech Warrior 2, Virtual-On hit the arcades with sharp, colourful 3D models in fast paced third-person action with (relatively) easy controls. This is perhaps the best example of East VS. West mentality when it comes to giant robots. Even in arcades, among other blooming 3D games, Virtual-On stood apart with its excellent presentation and unrelenting game play.

 

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Top 5 Games of 2017

It’s time for the last post of the year. As per tradition, time to go over the Top 5 games of the past year I’ve played, with additional five games that for multiple reasons didn’t get the spot, but I still played them more than I should’ve had.

Classic rules still apply; game can be from any year and I must have played the game for the first time this year in physical form, even if I had played the game previously otherwise. Digital-only games don’t need to apply, and I’m being strict on this rule this time around. Sadly, this also means Sonic Mania isn’t on this list, but it really should be. This year the amount of contenders were less than previously, so for once we have more mainstream titles from current year on the list. This also counts as the month’s review. The games aren’t in any specific order, but as usual, I’ve reserved the 4th and 5th spots for more special titles.

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Review of the Month; Pioneer LD-V4300D

A new Laserdisc player review nowadays is a bit of a rarity nowadays, but so are the people reading the reviews. For the interested, here’s a low-end user’s review of Pioneer’s LD-V4300D industrial Laserdisc player.

LD-V4300D, an industrial level Laserdisc player from UK working in the Nordics

Compared to the CLD-S315 I reviewed few years ago, this time I have a frame of reference of function and quality. Let’s start with the exterior, which is pretty much what you get here; a natural white box, weighing just below 13kg. There’s not much to see outside the front and the back. I don’t have a reason to open this one up at this point, but whenever I clean in from the inside sometime next year, I’ll be sure to grab some picture to update this post with.

But first, the LD-V4300D is an industrial player. It lacks the usual bells and whistles a consumer level players would have, like a front panel for information, CD-player function and such. However, the information from the panel can be accessed via the screen itself, to an extent, and everything with a disc drive can play CDs, this isn’t exactly a huge hurdle to get over. What its nature does affect is the design, which is hefty use of no nonsense decisions. It’s built like a steel house and made to last, its looks be damned. However, it does have its charm, and the control panel being slanted slightly upwards from the rest of the face does give it a feeling that everything was designed with a purpose over looks. It’s also rather large, hitting dimensions of 420 x 125 x 433mm, which means it has more depth that most players of its size.

For some of the important info bits out of the way; LD-V4300D plays both NTSC and PAL discs, and does not have a AC-3 output. However, if you can find yourself Pioneer DA-1 and connect it to the EFM port in the back, and you have yourself digital sound.The PAL and NTSC outputs are required to set from a separate selector as the player outputs pure signal rather than converting NTSC signal to PAL. The player also uses CX system, which is automated like always. Due to its nature as an industrial player, it plays both old LaserVision and newer LaserDisc discs.

Furthermore, the machine has a linear motor, meaning that unlike most models, this player is not belt driven. It does not flip sides, but that means there’s less parts to break. Whether or not this contributes to the player’s fast access speed to disc’s chapters, with CAV discs supposedly having one second search for any frame at 50 frame distance back or forth, and CLV maxing out at six seconds.

The buttons have a very satisfactory feeling, even after nearly thirty years of its production

The most important controls of the player are clustered to its one side. Open/Close, Play, the usual. Still/Step is frame perfect step back or forth with CAV discs, which Scan essentially being Chapter Skip. Display showcases info on the screen. PAL/NTSC button selects the region of the disc inside, which is indicated on the top with the lights, next to the remote sensor window. The Power button is a bit cumbersome to access, as it sits underneath the slant and needs to be pressed a bit deeper than you’d expect, but it does have a very, very satisfying physical switch feeling to it. Power indicator is on the other side of the player, seen in the larger front picture.

The Laser Barcode terminal just below the classy LaserDisc logo is a normal stereo mini jack, and could use either RU-103 remote or UC-V104BC barcode readers. The barcode readers could be used to skip directly to necessary bits on a disc during company presentation or education situation. In home use, it’s largely unnecessary dust hole that you can plug with a proper dust cover.

Heavy duty indeed

The back has the more interesting bits, to be honest. A hooded external power cord is required to power up this beast, and the player allows around 10% throw of current to either direction. The Voltage selector is a necessary thing, considering this piece was released for European market. Next to the power on the right we have C. Sync, with  75 ohm switch. This is useful if you need to use an external sync, but somehow I doubt most home users need that. It’s a V&H Lock anyway for CAV discs. Probably worthwhile in a studio environment, but no studio uses LD players anymore for anything.

But here’s we get video and sound. The V4300D offers three options to use; BNC, RC or D-SUB9 RGB. RC is the worst option of these, whereas BNC offers a high consumer level image similar to EuroSCART, with a better quality, from what I’ve seen. The RGB of course would yield the best possible quality, though I’ve been hard pressed to find a proper cable to test this out. Apparently, the RGB decoder this machine has is the same Sony V7021 that Commodore Amiga had, which gets an approval in my books. Currently, I’m running this on a BNC-to-SCART adapter cable, with two leads going to Left and Right audio at the other side of the machine.

The lack of AC-3 support is regrettable, but that’s what high-end consumer devices are for. However, as mentioned, the EFM socket there, with DIN connector, can output digital audio via aforementioned decoder. The sound quality is what you’d expect from stereo RC-jacks; they do their job. Could be better, but so could many other things in life.  The positive thing is that you can find anything that accepts these.

As for the RS-232C serial port, it’s best used with connecting to a computer terminal or if the player is used to play Laserdisc games like TimeGal or Dragon’s Lair. Apparently, with a proper ROM card like LaserAce you could switch the player into a dedicated game machine. Seeing Dragon’s Lair and its siblings have seen re-releases on PC, DVD players and God knows what else, there’s little reason to do this outside authenticity. I’d prefer TimeGal anyway. This is a considerable bonus, if you’re into LD games. The aforementioned RS232 interface, C. Sync and the EFM socket together could be used to make this player a proper LaserDisc game machine, but you’d need something like DA-V1000 LV-ROM adaptor in the middle.

A massive brick of a remote

The remote for the LD-V4300D isn’t the usual deal either. First, it didn’t come with the remote as a standard, you’ll need to buy it separate. Second, it feel very cheap and is lighter than it seems. The keys are membrane keys, but are clicky. Not the best feeling combination, or the most tactile, but it serves its purpose of keeping splatter and dust on the outside in industrial environment. The top has its usual IR window, but there’s another audio mini jack there, which you could connect to the player’s jack if you don’t have two AA batteries at hand. Some reports have mentioned that you can use other Pioneer LD remotes with the player, but CLD-S315 remote didn’t. The remote above isn’t the same as listed in the guides either, being model CU-113A, but appears to be the exact same as in the User’s Manual.

If you’re more interested in the technical aspects of the image quality, I’d recommend checking out Not On Blu-Ray’s more testific review. While it gives the player 3/5 result, for a general enthusiast who barely has access to LaserDiscs overall the LD-V4300D is a competent player. The lack of certain things, like a straight up SCART port, the image and sound quality are good. I’ve noticed that due to the better signal quality the image quality is better than with CLD-S135. The improvement isn’t world breaking, but notable.

This isn’t perhaps the best choice for anyone to pick up as a main LD player. However, it works great as a stopgag player if you can’t find a better one and simply need/want one. It’s more specialised ports and moddability (is that even a word?) does give it an edge to Dragon’s Lair and LD game enthusiasts overall. The player’s runs with a low noise as well. When starting to play, it has few good audible clicks, which all honesty are pretty satisfying. You don’t hear such things nowadays anymore.

In conclusion, a solid unit, but as a specialised player NTSC users may want to look for something better. As a PAL/NTSC combo, it’s probably one one of the better units out there with a relatively low price.

Review of the Month; original Xbox Controller

The original Xbox controller is infamous for being on the large side. It was originally named the Fatty or Fatso, it later got nicknamed more favourably as The Duke. I had my chance to test it when Xbox originally came out, but never after that. The Xbox Controller S, nicknamed as Akebono, was designed for the Japanese iteration of the console and later was adopted worldwide as the new standard, for few damn good reasons. That said, this review is written from standard sized hand perspective.

Well shit, there goes the center symbol

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Overly busy, nonsensical and lacking in imagination

While I would love to dive into and give my two cents on the quality of Star Trek: Discovery as a show, the blog’s not really a place for that. I’ll comment on the designs of STD instead, similar on what I did for Star Wars. Well, the title really says it all, doesn’t it? Well, I’m going to give it a shot and aim to veer away from comparing too much to old Trek shows, mainly because this is a reboot all things considered and because all the designs are far too advanced for its time period. I’ll also concentrate on the Federation designs, because I don’t want to lose my mind with the Klingon’s.

I’ve seen some people on the ‘net using busy and complex designs as synonyms to each other. This isn’t the case. Busy design just means there is a high amount of unnecessary details, lines, cuts and whatever else elements that simply don’t sit right. There are some designers who can make busy work extremely well, but it’s usually the first way to fill in “blank” space rather than working over the designs overall.

The uniforms and force fields are probably a good example of this. The uniforms don’t look too bad at a distance, but whenever we get a close-up, we see that nothing on it looks set-in. Every surface has a texture of some sort on it.

The above shots shows three things; the areas on her sides are riddled with smaller Federation symbols for whatever reason, the Federation badge itself is split into two for no reason and houses ranking pips. Pips, which would’ve been great on the collar, but the collar is now wasted to look funky with its asymmetric design. This asymmetry forces the zip to be on her right side more, but as seen from this shot, it still angles towards the middle of the jacket. It looks stupid. If the jacket had been single-breasted, this would’ve worked. Hell, it would’ve looked great even. Now, with the symmetrical stripes on the shoulders and itty bitty Starfeet logos on the sides, it looks someone botched their day at the clothes workshop and called it a day.

Pants on the other manage to look like uniform pants a bit more, but the unnecessary zippers on the sides look stupid. This sort of vertical pocket is not very practical, so maybe it’s to let some air in. The stripes on the shoulders continue down the pants’ sides, which we don’t see here, but at least they’ve consistent with them. The boots look pretty terrible, with soles jumping out like they were just attached to a pair they didn’t belong to. Let’ not forget that even the boots have Starfleet logo on them. Twice.

Here also get to see the stripes running on the side of the pants.

The only time the uniform looks good is when it’s straight. Any other time there’s a wrinkle or its twisted by a body movement, it looks pretty terrible. All because all the things that should line up don’t, and the texture gets all messed up. The Starfleet symbols don’t help in this at all, and their removal would make the uniform look lots better. Centering the zipper would help a lot too, or at least making it straight.

The force field is a another good example of this. Let’s pass the whole thing that safety force fields didn’t exist at this point in the timeline like they’re portrayed here, and let’s ask why the hell it has all those little lines running in it. There is no logical reason for it other than separate it from other force fields we’ve seen thus far, and certainly does not look like the ones in any Star Trek. It’s a good example of business for its own sake. I could touch upon Klingon designs and all other examples I could muster, but we’re going to go over the word limit as is, so let’s move on.

If the designs aren’t busy to be filled with something, they’re nonsensical and impractical at best. Chairs are always a good example.

The chairs we see here are actually a contrary example of busy design, but they’re a good example of a chair that would be horrible to sit on. Because they’re made from one large piece, there is nothing to adjust on them. The edges are hard and the cushioning looks inadequate. These are the chairs used in classrooms and the like, where you have to have a universal, cheap as hell chair, except even those tend to have some angle to allow natural back curvature. These would make your back ache.

Then again, not everybody has a chair and there are no seat belts. That’s a terrible position to work your whole day. The fact that the station is not adjustable to height means it’s designed for human use, which is a terrible oversight in a universe where aliens serve on Federation vessels.  Also notice how  w i d e  the captain’s chair is

Also notice the paneling in the room filling each and every surface, except the floor which has a carpet, further mudding the scene down. It’s also in a Dutch angle, making it look terribly shot. Straightening it makes a better shot, even if you have to crop stuff out.

A trope in science fiction is that screens are transparent. Considering nobody really would like a transparent screen with high-brightness visuals on it, SF really should get away with it. But a massive screen with unnecessary borders, information and statistics you can’t even see?

Darkening the bridge is another trope that should be dropped, because nothing sounds better than having bright as hell panels in front of your face and then have the room darkened, blinding you for a time. Just like the Dutch angle.

There are two problems with screen like this. First is that nobody is able to see the information on the screen, not even the viewer. The only valuable information that’d be nice here is the meter running at the top of the screen, except it’s relevancy changes all the time, and all the people who needs this information sees it more relevantly on their station. The information on either side of the screen is largely irrelevant, just as is the larger information charts on the right. Hell, the square in the middle functions as some sort of shield against brightness differences, but it actually turns the brightness up, not down. I thought it was some sort of zoomed-in window, but the space in there clearly isn’t zoomed in and we saw that zoom-in function looked completely different. I don’t know what the hell it is, but it’s absolutely nonsensical and impractical. Drop the excess stuff allow the view screen function as a giant window. You get all the data on your stations.

I don’t really need to put different snaps up on how the design are lacking imagination. All the designs, from lighting to chairs, clothing and even colour choices scream of generic science fiction show. Without the Starfleet symbol floating anywhere, on the costumes, this would fit any science fiction show out there. The design work is lacking that heart. It’s not necessarily even lacklustre, but it’s very safe and sits nicely in the middle-ground of being forgettable. The photography and the way scenes are shot doesn’t help the matter at all. The series’ designs are already finished, and unless they managed to revamp things, it’s still gonna look terribly dull.

Let’s not forget the terrible desktop lamps we have here and that Sarek’s hologram is sitting on a table he should not know exists there. Does he know there was a table there and has an exactly same height table at the exact same spot at his house to sit on whenever Michael calls him? Maybe I should come back to this and do a comparative technology level review after the show’s over

Review of the Month; Mayflash GameCube controller adapter

Mayflash is a Chinese producer of console and PC gaming goods. For at least decade and a half they’ve been producing adapters and dance mats, as well as the odd dongle for your WiFi needs. They have offered alternatives to officially licensed product pretty much all of their existence, and it’s not rare for them to offer adapters that would otherwise be too obscure for any other company to produce. It would seem that their philosophy has always been It has to work and be cheap, design be damned. I can’t really fault this philosophy, even if a designer’s heart bleeds because of it.

If you want to cut the chase with the review, I can condense it in one sentence; it looks cheap, but the insides are good quality and it works. However, if you want something more, let’s look at what’s on the outside first.

The dimensions of the box itself is 128 x 71 x 23 mm, with a . It is, all things considered, surprisingly small. However, it is also very light and prone slide every which way. All this makes a very portable piece of equipment, but it does feel a bit cheap due to this. The plastic used is rather standard and its matte finish makes it feel a pretty standard piece of tech. Despite this, due to the text and lightness the adapter does feel rather cheap. The lack of any sort of striking design, or moving the text to the bottom and leaving the top completely vacant, does add to the cheapness factor.

The controller ports have been marked with with dots, like in GameCube itself. However, they’re a bit too small to see, and you can see my haphazard attempt at painting them in the middle of the night didn’t exactly product the results. It would’ve been preferable to have the slots marked with paint, or have concave dots made on the plastic that the user could have painted himself. I can’t really say they do their job well enough, they’re just there. Better than nothing, but again Mayflash’s idea of skimping on the surface raises its head.

As said, the adapter slides on surfaces, but I’ve added few rubber pads to make it sit in place. Surprisingly, this little addition makes it feel a bit more quality product, but in the end is a useless addition. The box itself is held together with Phillips head screws, which is great. Not only it probably cut some costs off, but also allows the consumer to open it up, fix if anything’s broken or otherwise has a need for modifications or such. I’m somewhat surprised that Mayflash didn’t opt to use their logo on the top of the adapter, as their logo would’ve made a nice looking splash. However, I recognize that having nearly brandless piece of tech opens much easier avenues of surface modifications, some of which I’ll probably take advantage at a later date. Case modding is fun, after all.

While the controller ports themselves are the same as in the original GameCube, the inside that does the job is what matters more. I must say, this isn’t what I expected. While some bits here and there seem like they could’ve seen just a tad better soldering, all the components are of good quality and the tracing is nothing to scoff at. Compared to what sort of botch-job 8bit Music Power offered, this looks nothing short of great. It may not be as sturdy as Hori’s Famicom Mini Commander, but having a modern electronic device build as sturdily as they were in the 80’s is rather rare. This is really where Mayflash’s competence has come through most often. While the cases are pretty terrible, and I’ve had few of them just come apart due to shoddy design, the PCBs and function of the devices have always been between decent and top-notch.

The use for the adapter is, of course, emulation. Very few player would prefer using a GameCube controller elsewhere. Dolphin, currently the choice for GameCube and Wii emulation, offer native support to GameCube adapters and Mayflash is one of the best, if not the best, alternative option to the official Nintendo adapter. Hell, I’ll go for broke and recommend it over the official adapter anyway just because Mayflash’s adapter’s price is half of Nintendo’s and readily available from your local Internet seller. It also does allow change between Wii U and PC mode, which helps quite a lot of you’re aiming to use GameCube controllers for other games. I wouldn’t blame you, the controller is still pretty comfortable all things considered.

Of course, it functions just fine with Wii U, there are no problems here.

Just to reiterate, the box itself, and its terrible packaging design, are nothing to look at. However, what’s inside the box and how it functions is terrific. Just remember to go to Mayflash’s own site and download the latest drives, as Mayflash is a manufacturer that aim to tweak their stuff from time to time.

Review of the Month; Huion GT-220 v2 pen display

When I was initially writing this review last month, I came to a point where all I could say If you’re looking into moving digital drawing and painting, Huion GT-220 v2 fills that want with third the price of Wacom’s similar sized product. That’s the whole review in a nutshell, and expanding on that is slightly difficult. The reason for this not because Huion is worse product than its competitor, no. The reason for this that a pen display is only one-third of the equation. The second third is the software/s you’ll be using with the pen display, which doesn’t only impact what sort of lines you’ll be using, but also the digital tools you have in your use but also what you are able to do. Using Adobe Photoshop is a different thing from Paint Shop Pro or SAI. The last third is experience. You have may skill, which is easy to transition to digital realm in an extent, but you will always lack experience with any new given tool. If you’ve accustomed to work in a certain way with specific set of tools, changing to new ones will screw you up for a time, if not completely in certain situations. This applies to pen tablets doubly, as brands have fine but significant differences to them. We can always argue which brand has the best functions and why, but that’s always up to opinion.

To continue setting up personal point of comparison between tablets, my first proper drawing tablet was a version of Cybertablet M14 from early 2000’s. Before that I had used random huge, almost toyetic, drawing tablets on and off whenever I had a chance at certain schools. During the last decade or so, I’ve had an on-and-off relationship with Wacom’s tablets and pen displays. None of these had been what I’d call productive, as I always found myself being extremely limited for not being able to see where I was drawing. The fact that my eye-hand coordination was extremely hard to break made me abandon digital drawing altogether and concentrating on ink. TL;DR, I couldn’t get handle of digital drawing because the tip of the pen didn’t produce the line, it was the pointer on the screen.

Due to all this, this review will be more personal take on the item than previous, more objectivity driven reviews I’ve done. May that be a bonus or a detractor to you.

That said, any pen display would solve my problem. The problem just was that picking up a 13″ display would be too small when you’ve accustomed working on A3 size, but Wacom’s 22″ pen displays cost far too much for someone who always has to question his income. Thus, alternatives would need further research.

You can read GT-220 V2’s parameters at Huion’s own site, so I’ll be concentrating on the user experience and overall design of the pen display itself.

It’s hard to take good photos when you have no proper light, indoors or outside. Autumn is such a drab

First things first, I have a screen protector on, hence some of the bubbles and very slight scratching from the usage appearing in the photo. The design is very conservative in many ways, with it being a simple screen with nothing else going on with it. That’s a strength to GT-220, as this means there’s less things to break down on the outside.

The rubber bottom that serves at the basis of the display is meant to prevent shocks and raise it higher for easier access of the buttons on the lower right, as well as keeping the cords from the back from bending straight. However, this allows the display to pivot left or right if one is to lean unto it when working. I’ve solved this problem momentarily with thick cardboard rolls. This is not a problem for those who work in off the paper with only the pen touching the screen. I’ve found that this almost painting-position causes less stress and strain. This, in effect, is the only objectively negative point in the design of the piece, the rest are more or less subjective.

The back has two vents on both sides and one long line running near the top, otherwise they’re just your normal everyday plastic with texture. However, it’s good to show all the three leads you’ll need to run this pen display; the USB, the power and the VGA/DVI/HDMI. Without the rubber bottom, these would have to experience unnecessary stress, though it has to be mentioned that the way the rubber bottom has been installed is clearly an afterthought. Huion is using the same housing as they did with GT-220, so taking that into consideration the solution is understandable, but not wholly satisfactory.

Software installation was easy and there was not problems when following the guide. The software Huion delivers is rather spartan in function, but is efficient and does what it needs to do.

Pen configuration, pressure sensitivity, monitor select, test, calibration, settings import and export options. You don’t really need anything more with this tablet. Everything is very to the point. I’ve seen some claiming that the program does not save settings, but all that really is dependent on your screen setup. The pen display is recognized as a screen as long as you have it plugged to your computer and/or to the wall, even when powered down.  My setup is so that I have three screens, one of which is not always powered and recognized at all. This is relevant to the settings, as when you Export your settings, those same settings are imported every time you boot up. If you don’t Export your specific settings, the program will load up the default one. Now, because the pen display is the third screen I have, and the mostl-of-the-time-unpowered one is second, this means I need to check out whether or not the program recognized the pen display as the second or third screen. This also means that I can use the GT-220 as a standard, non-display pen tablet whenever I’d like to and draw to any other two screens.

The pen itself has lots of levels of pressure, which are all good and dandy. The tablet may not recognize angle of the pen, but that’s largely unnecessary. It’s a nice bonus to have, but this is one of the things you can work without just fine. You don’t miss what you don’t have. The pen’s light, and while others regard this a bonus, I would like to have slightly more heft to it. It feels just as cheap as any other pen I’ve used, but then again I would like everything to be made of steel. The pen display came with two pens and a USB charge cable (and a glove!) all of which is nice. The base contains a tool to pry a used tip off, with space for spare tips. Buttons are nice and clicky, just as you’d want them. The battery inside seems to have power for about three weeks worth of juice in it, but as usual with modern batteries, I’d recommend charging it after each use. During charging, a red light can be seen through the buttons.

The pointer does float somewhat off the pen’s tips, but this is not as straightforward as people tend to make it. There are three factors that affect how far your pointer is from the pen; thickness of the glass, the angle you are at and the calibration. You can muck around in the calibration and set your pointer into widely different positions from the tip, or spend a day like me and optimise the distance, only to change your posture and see the tip veering off a bit. How much the pointer lags behind the tip is within standard deviation compared to other tablets, and partially based on your hardware setup. The GT-220 doesn’t have any computing in it, so everything has to be done in your PC.

Speaking of buttons, the pen display lacks any of them outside Menu and settings. No shortcut keys to you. Whether or not you want them is up to you, but the lack of them is a plus to yours truly. Never cared for those anyway. The way I solved the lack of Ctrl+Z in one key press was to use a separate keypad and configuring that to host wide variety of macros, though I still tend to rush back and forth in Paint Shop Pro and using its on-screen buttons. Because how I’ve learned to utilise the pen as a tool in general, I have no need for a touch screen or quick macros, though I should get a better keypad with in-built macro modifier, like in Logitech G13. The total price would still be lower to Wacom’s 22″ displays, and you can use that keypad for variety of games, and with different settings, for variety of programs to boot.

The way the display reads the pen is really what you’d expect. The best way to showcase some of it is through it’s own Pressure Test tool.

Scribbles, always with the scribbles…

While not a draw tool in itself (hence the angles rather than smooth lines), the Pressure Test shows that with the above settings, the pen can do wide variety of thicknesses from the get go. While some prefer a heavy handed  approach to achieve thickness, I’ve set it one notch below middle way, meaning all I need is a light touch. The lines the display gives is very good, very standard, nothing to scoff at. A better example might something very quick, like a Pikachu done in Microsoft Paint.

Well that’s a piece of shit

Paint is something everyone on Windows can start up and make a comparison to. Paint limits the way line thickness works, but the that’s slightly beside the point. Here you can see that it does not do angles, unless I decide to do so. Pretty much everybody use a stablisation program anyway, but I’ve had a hard time getting my head around getting used to any I’ve tried out, be it Lazy Nezumi or something else. If you want something more wholesome, roll into Twitter. I do scribbles from time to time. Now that I think of it, in the previous transforming mecha design post I already used this pen display to quickly draw the examples. Nothing terribly exciting or decent, but showcases things a bit more.

This might be a good spot to say that a pen display does not make you better. It certainly give you better tools, depending on the software, but it’s up you just take up the pen and draw all day long, every day. Practice makes perfect, and perfection can’t be achieved.

The screen itself is nice. It’s bright enough to blind the ever living shit out of me, and the colours are satisfactory enough, hard to say how off they are without external equipment. I didn’t see any colour popping too much on top of another.

Part of the experience is, of course, with the screen itself. Huion uses a glass display, which is very sleek and very friction-less. It’s not like drawing on paper, but drawing with a tablet never is. Wacom advertises itself with its surfaces that have slight paper-like grit to them. Whether or not you value this is up to you, and you can pick up screen protectors with different grit to them. Again, to what you’re used to plays a big part. Once you learn to paint on glass, moving up to this kind of pen display is easy.

Huion GT-220 v2 might lack some of the capabilities its three times more expensive Wacom equivalent costs, I really have to question how much there is need for a touch screen function, macro keys on the display itself and angle recognition. Again, it’s all about how you’re used to work and what’s most efficient way for you to work rather than what’s available to you. Sometimes too many options and tools hampers the progress, and the core tools and the mastery over them is often more than enough.

At the moment, Huion is selling these pen displays on Amazon for some 510€. At this price, the GT-220 v2 is extremely good for starting to draw with a pen display or tablet in general. All that it lacks is luxury after all that only add to the price. Wacom enthusiasts will scoff at it, but Huion as a Chinese manufacturer has been catching their missteps along the way, and GT-220 v2 is their best piece thus far.

While I don’t have enough time to properly practice, for the last three months I’ve done all my drawing wants and need on the pen display. I’ve been happy that it works as expected, and the only thing that keeps things from being better is me myself.